Pier Entertainment Presents: Up-Close Live Featuring Zeek “The Experience”, Jade Alston, Aaron Camper, Rafiya & More – Thursdays, September 18 – October 23

first_img Zeek “The Experience” – September 18 Originally from Illinois, Zeek made the trek to Philadelphia where he felt his talent could thrive. His voice is soulful with an out of this world range. A vocalist, arranger and songwriter, Zeek’s live show will surely take you on an unforgettable musical journey. Jade Alston – September 25 A Philly native, Alston’s deep and sultry tone sets her apart from the rest. She has been working on new music and finding a new voice and will debut brand new music as a part of her set. Alston has toured with Marsha Ambrosius and spearheads her own creative movement that encourages people to find their own artistry. Ju-Taun & T-Shaw – October 2 Group members, Jake and James grew up worlds apart from Samoeun, but they come together to make a mix of music that is classic soul, folk, classic rock and a little bit of everything that influenced them growing up. The diversity in their group is reflected in their musical approach. The group has made some major movies, and has even done work with Philadelphia legend, Leon Huff. A self-taught multi-instrumentalist, T-Shaw has a show full of music he has composed and written. His father was a preacher so his music is influenced by gospel but also some of the soulful greats like Marvin Gaye, Teddy Pendergrass, and Buddy Ace. Kriss Mincey – October 9 The true definition of a song bird. Kriss Mincey has one of the purest voices but can still bring a bit of the grit. Her alternative R&B style is refreshing and she will even spit a spoken word type rhyme for you too. Her versatility sets her apart and strives to encourage creativity in others through her music and writing. Rafiya – October 16 A Philly-based artist, Rafiya group up traveling the world. Her tenure at Temple University brought her to Philadelphia where she continued to dig in to the local music community. Her music spans between French, her native tongue and English. Her music tells stories of the human experience.   Aaron Camper – October 23 A vocalist that is full of life and commands the stage the moment he steps on it. Camper mixes his highly developed vocal ability with fun and introspective songwriting which brings you into his world. His mix of Soul, folk, hip hop and a little gospel creates a captivating sound. Pier Entertainment presents: Up-Close Live When: Thursdays, September 18 – October 23, 7pm and 9 pm sets Where: Relish, 7152 Ogontz Avenue Cost: $10 More Info: Click here for details. Aaron Camper & Friends(D. McDowell for Philly 360°/ Visit Philly) Pier Entertainment is back, and they’re bringing Philly a dope new live music series featuring some of the city’s hottest emerging talents. Up-Close Live kicks off this week at West Oak Lane soul-food staple Relish and boasts an impressive lineup of soul, R&B and pop acts. This week, the inaugural showcase launches on Thursday, September 18 with two sets by vocalist Zeek ‘The Experience. In addition to two full sets by each artist at 7pm and 9pm, there will also be a live interview with Philly-based blogger and Ebony contributor Sincerely Syreeta. Guests will also be able to enjoy special menu pricing for the show as well. As we’ve already mentioned, the Up-Close Live lineup is serious. So, for the next few weeks, we suggest that you make Relish your go-to spot on Thursday evenings.  You can check out the artists and the schedule of shows below.center_img Check out our exclusive with singer/songwriter Aaron Camper.last_img read more

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Two south Columbia fires during lightning-packed storms

first_imgCrews responded to a couple fires caused by lightning strikes on Tuesday in south Columbia.One at about 10 p.m. Tuesday started in the attic of an apartment on Aspen Heights Parkway. Investigators say it led to about $30,000 in damage.A family dog was rescued after a fire started by a lightning strike at about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday on Brackenhill Court off Route K (pictured). That fire began on the roof. It led to about $50,000 in damage.No people were hurt in either fire.(This story was last updated at 10:04 a.m. Wednesday.)last_img

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France tightens rules in wake of fatal clinical trial

first_imgThe French government is taking measures to lower the health risks to volunteers in clinical trials in the wake of the final report about a study that killed one person and landed five others in the hospital in January. Furthermore, the contract research company that conducted the study, Rennes, France–based Biotrial, must within a month provide a “plan of action” explaining how it will avoid a repeat of its mistakes during the trial or lose its operating license, French health minister Marisol Touraine said today at a press conference on the report’s release.The 127-page report by France’s General Inspectorate of Social Affairs (IGAS) doesn’t pinpoint why or how the potential drug caused brain damage in previously healthy control subjects; it calls on the government to “mobilize the international scientific community” to find out what went wrong and suggests a range of scientific approaches, such as testing whether the drug hits other brain targets than the intended one and a study of the potential toxicity of the compound’s metabolites. In the fatal trial, Biotrial tested a drug, named BIA 10-2474, that acts on the body’s endocannabinoid system, a network of receptors and other molecules in the nervous system, some of which play a role in the response to cannabis. The drug’s developer, Portuguese pharmaceutical company Bial, believed it might be of use in a wide range of conditions, including anxiety, mood disorders, and Parkinson’s disease. The problems surfaced in a group that received multiple doses of 50 milligrams daily as part of a phase I trial, in which a drug’s safety is studied in healthy people. Ninety subjects who had previously received single doses of up to 100 milligrams or multiple doses of up to 20 milligrams had not suffered from any dangerous side effects.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)IGAS’s new report confirms many of the conclusions of an interim report released in February. The inspectors say that Biotrial’s study design complied with French regulation and current standards, and animal tests did not raise any red flags. But the company made major mistakes after the first volunteer—a 49-year-old singer, painter, and composer who would later die—was taken to a hospital with headaches and blurry vision on 10 January. The remaining participants in the trial were given another dose of the drug the next morning, for instance, and were not properly informed of what had happened. Biotrial didn’t alert French authorities until 14 January.Touraine today announced several measures aimed at improving safety and strengthening the response when a trial goes awry. France’s Regional Health Agencies will be asked to carry out inspections at all clinical trial centers in the country, together with the National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM). The latter agency will start producing monthly reports of all serious, unexpected side effects in phase I and II studies, and a new expert group at ANSM will review and approve each study, Touraine said.Touraine did not address one key criticism in the report, however. Biotrial started giving 50-milligram doses of the drug to all the subjects at the same time, rather than using a staggered participation schedule. The latter setup would have taken more time, but would have allowed monitoring each volunteer’s health before moving on to the next one.In a press release, Bial stressed that the trial protocol had been approved by ANSM and that it had no reason to expect problems with the 50-milligram dose. “There were no alerts, or signals in any of the safety parameters collected from any of the previous cohorts that could have anticipated the tragic accident,” the company says.Biotrial, meanwhile, issued a statement saying that it is “shocked” to only receive the report this morning after Touraine’s press conference, although copies were leaked to French newspapers Le Monde and Libération over the weekend. The company says it has already filed the plan of action requested by Touraine, and harshly criticized IGAS’s investigation, which it says didn’t respect the “adversarial principle” or the rights of people interviewed. The company didn’t elaborate, however, and did not dispute any of the specific charges in the report.Although it doesn’t call the overall study unethical, the IGAS report questions whether healthy people should have been exposed to a drug whose proposed benefit was never very clear. “In the eyes of some experts, the potential added value of the product in the therapeutic arsenal was questionable,” the report says. And although Bial had promised “a large panoply of potential future therapeutic benefits,” it hadn’t explained why BIA 10-2474 would be better than other molecules. Similar questions arise with other candidate drugs however; the report says the issue merits a “public debate at the international level.”last_img read more

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Report: Mexico 3 Costa Rica 2

first_imgMexico ended a four-match losing streak with a come-from-behind 3-2 win over Costa Rica in a friendly on Thursday.Raul Jimenez’s penalty proved the match-winner at the Estadio Universitario de Nuevo Leon after the hosts had twice come from behind, Victor Guzman and Henry Martin cancelling out goals from Joel Campbell and Bryan Ruiz.Campbell opened the scoring just before the half-hour mark, the forward heading in a Bryan Oviedo cross at the back post. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! But the hosts responded four minutes later, a fine team move ending with Guzman wonderfully side-footing a volley into the top corner from a Jose van Rankin cross.¡Lo podemos ver mil veces! ¡GO-LA-ZO @CocaColaMX de @GuzmanPocho! #PasiónyOrgullo pic.twitter.com/LPEKiMj52o— Selección Nacional (@miseleccionmx) October 12, 2018Costa Rica – who announced Gustavo Matosas as their next coach on Tuesday – restored their lead just before half-time through Ruiz, who placed a penalty into the bottom corner after Van Rankin gave away a spot-kick for a handball in the area.Ruiz’s goal was his 25th for the national team, moving him into outright fifth on Costa Rica’s all-time list.Introduced at half-time, Martin scored his first international goal to draw Mexico level once more in the 56th minute, heading in a Jurgen Damm cross.Martin continued to have a major impact, fouled from a set-piece to give Jimenez a chance from the penalty spot and the forward made no mistake as Mexico claimed a first win since the World Cup and extended Costa Rica’s run without a victory to eight matches.¡GOL @Movistar!@Raul_Jimenez9 se hace presente en el marcador con la especialidad de la casa. #PasiónyOrgullo pic.twitter.com/dryK3oeN3I— Selección Nacional (@miseleccionmx) October 12, 2018 read morelast_img read more

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New Zealand v South Africa first Test ends drawn after final day washout

first_imgThe first Test between New Zealand and South Africa ended in a draw on Sunday after heavy rain washed out the fifth and final day’s play in Dunedin, leaving both sides frustrated at losing the chance to take a 1-0 lead in the three-match series.The match had been delicately poised entering the final day with South Africa 224 for six in the second innings, a lead of 191 runs, with captain Faf du Plessis on 56 and Vernon Philander on one at University Oval.Heavy rain that began early on Sunday, however, ensured a delayed start and after the scheduled lunch break was taken at 1 p.m. (0000 GMT), umpires Kumar Dharmasena and Bruce Oxenford decided there was no chance of any play.”I think the game was shaping up quite nicely for all three results,” New Zealand captain Kane Williamson said. “The game was certainly in the balance and it’s just a shame not to get any play today.”But it’s nice going into the second match with both teams having played some good cricket.”New Zealand will enter the second match at Wellington’s Basin Reserve without batting stalwart Ross Taylor, who tore his calf muscle during the first innings, while left arm pace bowler Trent Boult is under an injury cloud.”It’s a real shame to lose Ross, our premier batter, but therein lies an opportunity for someone else,” Williamson added.”(Trent) does have a little niggle but we don’t know how serious it is yet. He will travel with us to Wellington and hopefully he will recover. He is a big player for us.”advertisementDu Plessis felt his side could also have won the game had they set New Zealand a target of about 250 runs in 60 overs.”It was set up to be a great finish,” du Plessis said. “We were looking to get about another 50 or 60 runs and on this wicket the ball is turning nicely and (left-arm spinner) Keshav (Maharaj) got five in the first innings.”The nature of the wicket was you could either get wickets quickly or it’s slow scoring and we were favouring our chances because Ross was not going to bat and Trent was injured.”South Africa’s opening batsman Dean Elgar, who scored 140 in the first innings and 89 in the second, was named man of the match.The second game in Wellington starts on March 16, before the third match at Seddon Park in Hamilton begins on March 25.last_img read more

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Government designates 12 Olympians as National Observers

first_imgNew Delhi, Mar 20 (PTI) The government of India has designated 12 Olympians, including Beijing Olympic gold medallist shooter Abhinav Bindra, as National Observers in their respective disciplines to assist in preparation and implementation of the long-term development plan. Besides Bindra, other named as National Observers are P T Usha and Anju Bobby George (athletics), Sanjeev Kumar Singh (archery), Aparna Popat (badminton), MC Mary Kom and Akhil Kumar (boxing), Jagbir Singh (hockey), Somdev Devvarman (tennis), Karnam Malleshwari (weightlifting), Sushil Kumar (wrestling), I M Vijayan (football), Khajan Singh (swimming) and Kamlesh Mehta (table tennis). “The National Observers will assist the Government, Sports Authority of India, and National Sports Federations (NSFs) concerned including Indian Olympic Association in the preparation and implementation of the long term development plan with respect to high priority and priority sports covering all aspects including selection policy, quality specifications for National Camps, long term athlete development plan, coaching development, development of technical officials and monitoring & evaluation of athlete performance,” said a Sports Ministry statement. “Apart from providing inputs for their respective disciplines, the National Observers would also to be consulted as a group on crosscutting issues impacting sports development in the country.” According to the statement the National Observers would be playing a key role in implementation of action plans for Mission Olympics 2020, 2024 and 2028. PTI SSC AT ATlast_img read more

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Tennis player Ankita Raina included in TOPS

first_img(EDS: Adding Ankitas quote) New Delhi, Apr 28 (PTI) Tennis player Anikta Raina, who has displayed good form this season both in the Fed Cup and the professional circuit, was today included in the governments Target Olympic Podium Scheme (TOPS). “Wishing you all the best for your future endeavours, Ankita! Hope you continue making the nation proud. Many congratulations @ankita_champ ! #TOPSAthlete #SAI,” the Sports Authority of India wrote on its Twitter handle. Ankita recently broke into the top-200, reaching a career-best 197 in the WTA rankings released earlier this month. She also became only the third Indian to breach the top-200 mark in womens singles, jumping 15 places to reach 197. ?I am happy to be in TOP scheme and would like to thank SAI, AITA and SAG for all their support. My best performances have always come when playing for the country and I will definitely not fall short of giving my best effort to achieve my aim,? Ankita told PTI from China. The 25-year-old Ankita, who trains with Hemant Bendrey when she is in the country, is the first player to achieve the feat since Sania Mirza. Before Sania, Nirupama Vaidyanathan had made it to the top-200. Ankitas next target is to break into the top-150. PTI AH BS BS BSlast_img read more

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IOWA D-N-R INVESTIGATES WASTE SPILL AT WHITING

first_imgThe Iowa Department of Natural Resources is investigating a waste discharge near the Whiting Wastewater Treatment Plant.The DNR was notified last Friday that a clay tile line was discharging into a ditch near the Whiting’s wastewater plant.DNR staff found a tile line discharging sewer waste into the Candless-Cleghorn ditch, which runs into Guard Lake.It’s estimated that approximately 50 gallons per minute were being discharged into the ditch.The DNR says it is unknown how long the discharge has been taking place or whether it is connected to the city’s wastewater treatment plant.Whiting city officials plan to cap the tile line with concrete within the next 48 hours, which should stop the bypass into the ditch.They also plan to hire consultants to identify the origin of the tile line and what it may be connected to.last_img read more

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KMC to make rainwater harvesting mandatory in big housing complexes

first_imgKolkata: The Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) is set to make rainwater harvesting mandatory in big housing complexes, in a bid to conserve water. The civic authorities are contemplating to change the Building Rules and incorporate the new provision, Mayor Firhad Hakim said on Monday.Hakim visited the chamber of Director General (Building) Anindya Karfarma and spoke to the senior officials of the department in a bid to improve work culture in KMC. He was accompanied by the Municipal Commissioner Khalil Ahmed. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaIn order to reduce the harassment of people, KMC is planning to bring the Block Land and Land Reforms Office (BLLRO) and Building department under one roof. The civic body is accepting building plans online and in cases where conversion of land has taken place, the owners have to get clearance from the BLLRO, which often takes a lot of time. If the Building department and BLLRO work together, it will prevent the harassment of the owner of the land. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayHakim said rainwater harvesting in big housing complexes will be done as a move to save ground water. The rainwater will be used for cleaning, flushing and gardening. The ground water level has drastically fallen in several parts in the city. It may be recalled here that the Chennai Municipal Corporation (CMC) has made rainwater harvesting in big apartment blocks and housing complexes mandatory two decades ago. Hakim had earlier proposed to set up special zones to wash vehicles in order to save wastage of drinking water. The state government has taken special measures to save water. July 12 will be observed as Save Water Day every year. The state Public Health Engineering (PHE) department had organised a walk from Jorasanko Thakurbari to Gandhiji’s statue at Mayo Road on July 12, in which Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee took part. The state Panchayat and Rural Development department has also instructed all the Gram Panchayats not to rampantly lift ground water and prepare schemes for rainwater harvesting in the rural areas.last_img read more

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APTN Investigates Indigenous people in Canada behind bars

first_img(Former prison watchdog, Howard Sapers explains some of the factors that have led to the over-representation of Indigenous people in Canadian prisons)“Once you get that label of being high risk, it sticks with you. And that leads to more time in custody, fewer opportunities for conditional release, worst chances for successful reintegration. Which means higher recidivism and the whole cycle starts again.”And the trend isn’t slowing down.When Sapers was first appointed to the Office of the Correctional Investigator in 2004, the proportion of federally sentenced Indigenous men and women was around 17 per cent – by the time he left in 2016, it was 25 per cent, today it’s 27 per cent.“This is in spite of criminal law amendments, Supreme Court judgments and a whole bunch of other social policy initiatives and it keeps on getting worse,” says Sapers. “And so there has been this reluctance to really engage and figure out root causes and what we have to do to stem the flow.”Click here to read more about the growing disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous offendersOne man helping to stem that flow is Mark Marsolais-Nahwegahbow…He is the founder of IndiGenius and Associates, an Ottawa-based First Nations-led Aboriginal justice consulting firm.“These are communities that I work with, these are my communities and it’s really sad to see that the numbers are increasing,” says Marsolais-Nahwegahbow. “These institutions are the new residential schools.”His firm specializes in the writing of Gladue Reports, a type of pre-sentencing report that examines the personal histories and backgrounds of Indigenous offenders to help courts determine a sentence.“That report is a sacred story that needs to be respected, by the courts, by myself and everyone that it’s placed in front of,” he added. “And for some people, it’s the first time in their life that they’ve had that opportunity to share.”(Mark Marsolais-Nahwegahbow. Photo: APTN)In 1999, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that all reasonable alternatives to incarceration must be taken into account when dealing with Indigenous offenders.But according to Marsolais-Nahwegahbow, many courts have failed to take the underlying principal seriously.“Do I really feel that these Gladue reports are being used in case management within the provincial and federal systems? I don’t know what the percentage is but I don’t believe so,” he says. “Gladue is one area that is still being run by the western justice system and for some reason, they don’t let go.“It needs to be given back so that we can control it and we can heal our people.”Click here to find out more about IndiGenius & Associates and what goes into writing a Gladue Report.There is also a shortage of experienced Gladue writers across the country – something that Marsolais-Nahwegahbow and his firm have been trying to address for years.He has recently partnered with the Vancouver Community College in B.C. and is in the process of designing a curriculum for writing Gladue Reports.It’s still in the early stages but he hopes one day to have it offered as a full-fledged course.“We need more Gladue writers, we need expert Gladue writers,” he says. “It’s trying to set a national standard so there’s something to benchmark because the reports obviously in the court system are still being scrutinized.”So where exactly does the federal government stand in all of this?While the over-incarceration of Indigenous people in Canada has been well-documented for decades, changes to the criminal justice system have been slow and largely ineffective.25-years ago, under the Corrections and Conditional Release Act, they recognized that the approach to corrections should be fundamentally different for Indigenous people.A more restorative community-based approach to corrections was passed into law but has never been fully implemented.It’s an issue that the current Correctional Investigator of Canada, Ivan Zinger, recently brought up in his annual report.“These sections allow for the minister of Public Safety to enter into agreements with Indigenous communities for the care, custody or supervision of Indigenous people by Indigenous communities,” he said.(Canada’s Correctional Investigator Ivan Zinger) Currently, there are only nine such healing lodges in operation across the country. Five are operated solely by the Correctional Service of Canada while the others four are run by Indigenous communities.But according to Zinger, the lodges are grossly underfunded, understaffed and there remains a large gap in funding between those run by the CSC and those that are operated by the communities.“My issue is that there was a great opportunity 25 years ago to really do some great corrections and hand over some responsibilities back to Indigenous communities,” Zinger told APTN. “But it wasn’t embraced, it wasn’t done right. And I would hope that the Correctional Service of Canada and the Minister of Public Safety would actually look at this closely to improve the correctional outcome of Indigenous people.”“For me the number one human rights issue in Canada – that the incarceration rate for Indigenous people keeps climbing year after year after year, relentlessly. Indigenous people are released much later in their sentences than non-Aboriginal, most of them at statutory release, which means that two-thirds of their sentence.“They are in higher security typically, they’re more likely to be in segregation and then when they do go out, they’re more likely to be suspended or revoked.”Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale has welcomed Correctional Investigator’s Annual Report and responded in a written statement.“To help address the over-representation of Indigenous Peoples in Canada’s criminal justice system, and to help those who have been incarcerated heal, rehabilitate and find good jobs, Budget 2017 invested $65.2 million over five years, starting in 2017-18, and $10.9 million per year thereafter.”Click here to read Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale’s full statement.What about the federal Minister of Justice?As part of her mandate, Jody Wilson-Raybould has been tasked with reforming the Canadian criminal justice system, specifically as it relates to the over-representation of Indigenous people incarcerated.“I fundamentally believe that a measure of my success as the minister of Justice will be recognizing where those numbers are at the end of my mandate,” Wilson-Raybould told APTN. “And addressing the issues that have brought the vast majority of people into the criminal justice system, other than criminality.“Looking at issues like addictions and mental health issues, looking at poverty, marginalization, looking at the legacy of colonialism for Indigenous peoples.”(Justice Minister and Attorney General of Canada Jody Wilson-Raybould)While crimes rates have been on a steady decline over the last decade, the previous Conservative government’s “Tough on Crime” agenda had an adverse impact on Indigenous offenders.One that saw harsher conditions of confinement, a focus on security as opposed to rehabilitation, mandatory minimum and longer sentences and fewer opportunities for conditional release and parole.The Liberal government is in the process of reversing some of that legislation but progress has been slow.“To move away from punishment and towards other measures of restorative justice, addressing delays in the criminal justice system and also ensuring that we’re looking at prevention,” Wilson-Raybould added. “And making a concerted effort that we provide the wrap-around services that are necessary through drug treatment courts and sentencing circles.“That we provide the necessary off ramps for individuals, so hopefully the first time they find themselves in the criminal justice system will be the last time. “It’s a tall order.After 150 years of policies and laws meant to keep Indigenous people marginalized, changes to the system require a fundamental shift in the relationship between Canada and its first people. According to the office of the Correctional Investigator, Indigenous inmates are routinely classified as higher risk offenders and higher need in categories such as employment, community reintegration and family supports. (Independent Senator, Kim Pate addresses the failure of the government to deal with the over-incarceration of Indigenous people in Canada.)“Our governments, provincial, territorial and federal have a responsibility to hold up the standard and demand that the standard of care, that’s available for individuals, is one that upholds our law. Not one that actually persistently keeps people down.”But how do you change a system and a way of thinking that’s as old as the Canadian state itself?For Dan Parlow, it was reconnecting with his culture – something that was denied to him throughout his life both in and out of prison.“My life hasn’t been exactly perfect, I’ve had my falls along the way too,” Parlow says. “But it’s a journey right and being connected to the land, going to ceremonies, working with Elders and healing circles. So when that fall came I knew where to return for my healing. But it’s not like a light switch, after 30 years of incarceration, healing is a lifetime journey.”After being released from prison in 2013, he began studying criminology at Ottawa’s Carleton University.In between classes he also works as a research assistant with the hopes of one-day teaching and helping other former inmates reintegrated into society.“I’m studying criminology in the hopes of being a part of the dismantling of this colonial justice system that is hurting our people,” Parlow says.“And possibly one day returning back to the university and teaching criminology through an Indigenous lens. Working with what’s left of my life and helping others.”But while Parlow was able to change his life for the better, he doesn’t deny that it’s still a daily struggle.“We are continually healing and for the other Indigenous people incarcerated, I’d like to reach out to them and let them know that there is hope to return to those ceremonies, return to the Elders and their teachings. “It’s not going to be an easy journey, it’s a long journey and it’s painful at times but it’s well worth it.” It was a chaotic upbringing that he calls a pipeline to prison. Cullen Crozier APTN InvestigatesAt 52 years old, Dan Parlow has spent more than half his life, over 30 years, behind bars.Parlow is Anishinaabe, originally from the Batchewana First Nation, near Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.Like many Indigenous children of his generation, he was taken off his home reserve and away from his mother at just three months old — a victim of the 60s Scoop.Parlow was adopted out to a non-Indigenous family. It was the first of many homes where he suffered years of abuse and neglect at the hands of his “caregivers.”(APTN Investigates met up with Parlow to discuss the growing over-representation of Indigenous people in Canada’s criminal justice system.)“Numerous group homes, foster care, later on to detention homes, training schools, provincial jails and then penitentiaries. I didn’t have much hope, I was very lost and didn’t know who I was. There’s a lot of painful experiences that came out of that, a lot of things I regret, that I did to myself and others.”Parlow eventually ran away from foster care and found himself living on the streets. He soon turned to a life of crime, was convicted of armed robbery and sentenced to 18 months at the Guelph Correctional Institute.He was only 16.“There was no Young Offenders Act back then, so you’re a 16-year-old boy going into a man’s prison,” Parlow told APTN. “It was traumatizing, it was traumatizing. I refer to it as the ‘University of Crime,’ as it progressed right.”(Guelph Correctional Institute)Parlow spent the next three decades battling drug and alcohol abuse, both in and out of provincial jails and federal penitentiaries. His charges included conspiracy, various assaults, robberies, and firearms violations. Once ‘inside’ he learned how to be a better criminal.“The institution itself, the policies and the actions that take place in there from corrections, made me in many ways,” Parlow recalls. “I was a lost individual, and full of a lot of pain, feeling like I had no connection to this world and you know, you live that way.“I honestly didn’t’ think I’d live to see 25.”Dan Parlow’s story isn’t unique…While Indigenous people make up just under five per cent of the Canadian population, they now account for over 27 per cent of all inmates incarcerated in federal institutions.The situation is even more distressing for federally sentenced Indigenous women.Over the last 10 years, their numbers of incarceration have more than doubled.Approximately 39 per cent of women incarcerated are now Indigenous, making them the fastest growing prison population in the country.But what exactly is driving this mass over-incarceration of Indigenous people in Canada?“There are a number of factors and they interact,” says Howard Sapers, the former Correctional Investigator of Canada. “You have to account for systemic discrimination and bias. That is a feature of the Canadian criminal justice system, sadly today.“But it’s not the only factor and perhaps not even the biggest contributor, there are also historic reasons.”(Former federal Correctional Investigator Howard Sapers. Photo: APTN)Stopping or even reversing the over-incarceration of Indigenous people in Canada goes beyond the justice system.There are numerous social issues, historical traumas, gaps in policy and root causes that have adversely impacted Indigenous people and communities for generations.“Indigenous men and women carry a lot of disadvantage with them and they carry a lot of disadvantage that flows directly from colonial contact,” Sapers added. “So intergenerational trauma, the lingering effects of residential schools, of the 60s Scoop, of other policies around assimilation, the destruction of culture and language, breaking up families. These have lasting impacts.”last_img read more

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30 Migrants Storm Spanish Border Fence in Melilla

By Kimberly J. AvalosRabat – About 30 of more than 100 migrants successfully jumped the border fence from Morocco into Spain’s North African enclave of Melilla on Sunday, a local government official told Agence France Presse.The incident is the tenth attempt to storm the fence this year, as reported by AFP, with some 50 migrants managing to get into Melilla. Irene Flores, spokeswoman for the local government told AFP that a group of 120 people from Sub-Saharan Africa stormed the six-meter high fence early on Sunday morning.The migrants chanted “victory, victory” as they arrived at the CETI, the short-stay immigrant center, where they usually stop for a few weeks before they seek to reach continental Spain and either stay there or travel throughout Europe, as reported by Reuters.Spain has two enclaves in Morocco, Ceuta and Melilla, and migrants from all over Africa regularly try to reach them, by climbing the triple barriers that separate them from Morocco or swimming along the coastline.The border system in Melilla is composed of two six-meter-high fences, with a crisscross of steel cables in between, according to AFP.After thousands of migrants crossed from Africa to the enclave in 2014 and 2015, Spain stepped up security at the Melilla border last year. Although there is no official data, just a few dozen are believed to have made it so far in 2016, according to Reuters. read more

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Indonesias first subway opens in its gridlocked capital

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo has opened a long-awaited subway in the country’s capital aimed at staving off crippling traffic gridlock with comfortable transport facilities.Jakarta’s first subway is the latest of many infrastructure improvements nationwide that it is hoped will help the giant but laggard nation catch up with its neighbours.Widodo inaugurated the first phase of 16-kilometre (10-mile) subway line running south from Jakarta’s downtown on Sunday, while also presiding over a groundbreaking ceremony for an 8-kilometre (5-mile) line heading northward that is planned to be completed by 2024.The $2.6 billion project is funded through a loan from the Japan International Cooperation Agency.Congestion has relentlessly worsened in the past decade as car ownership rose, squeezing more and more vehicles onto Jakarta’s unchanging road network.The Associated Press read more

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ICG report slams government on TNA talks

The Sri Lankan government’s refusal to negotiate seriously with Tamil political leaders or consider reasonable forms of power sharing is heightening ethnic tensions and damaging prospects for sustainable peace.Sri Lanka: Tamil Politics and the Quest for a Political Solution, the latest report from the International Crisis Group (ICG), examines political opportunities and challenges in finding a realistic strategy for the Tamil community to claim its rights against a government that remains opposed to power sharing. The government’s position follows a long tradition in Sinhala nationalist thinking that rejects the Tamil and Tamil-speaking character of the north and much of the east. Military and economic policies have been institutionalising this ideological position with vigour. The de-facto military occupation of the northern province and state-sponsored cultural and demographic changes appear designed to undermine Tamils’ ability to claim the north and east as their homeland. In the face of the government’s aggressive policies, Tamil leaders are under increased pressure from their constituents to adopt more confrontational language and tactics, the report added.It also said that international actors should press the government for the speedy establishment of an elected provincial council and full restoration of civilian government in the north. They should insist that the government start serious negotiations with the TNA and that it make no new moves to dilute provincial powers. The report says the administration of President Mahinda Rajapaksa has failed to honour agreements with the Tamil National Alliance (TNA), broke promises to world leaders and refused to implement constitutional provisions for minimal devolution of power to Tamil-speaking areas of the north and east. Instead, the government is pursuing a policy of militarisation and biased economic development in Tamil and Muslim areas. “Three and a half years after the end of the civil war, President Rajapaksa has delayed long-promised elections to the northern provincial council – elections the TNA would be nearly certain to win”, says Alan Keenan, Crisis Group’s Sri Lanka Project Director. “Rather than address Tamils’ legitimate demands for a fair share of power in areas where they have traditionally been the majority, the Rajapaksa administration has begun discussing a new amendment to reduce provincial powers even further”. At the same time, Tamil leaders need to rebuild relationships with Muslims – damaged by years of war and Tamil Tiger abuses – while making clear the links between the Tamil struggle for equality and the growing unease among Sinhalese at corruption and government abuse of power. Tamils are likely to win their rights only when the broader national struggle for the restoration of democracy and the rule of law, including the independence of the judiciary, has made substantial progress.“So long as the government refuses to devolve power to those areas in the north and east where Tamils and Muslims have for centuries been the majority, separatist demands are likely to be attractive to large numbers of Tamils in Sri Lanka”, says Paul Quinn-Judge, Crisis Group’s Acting Asia Program Director. “This would be a recipe for continued ethnic polarisation and political volatility”. read more

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Yemen Time is running out to head off devastating famine warns UN

“My primary concern is the innocent children, women and men of Yemen, and I urge all parties to end the fighting and support efforts to build peace,” said David Beasley, WFP Executive Director, in a statement on Wednesday. “Only an immediate cessation of hostilities will give the humanitarian community the sustained access it needs to provide the food and other vital assistance needed to save Yemeni lives,” he added.Yemen is facing one of the world’s deepest humanitarian crises with 22.2 million people in need of life-saving assistance, including food, safe water, nutritional support and basic medical care, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).The country’s economy has taken a nose dive since conflict between government forces and their allies, to quell Houthi rebels, escalated in 2015. There has been a 180 per cent depreciation of the Yemeni Riyal in three years. The cost of basic food items has increased by 35 per cent in the past 12 months, leaving many families unable to feed themselves, leading to the world’s largest hunger crisis, with 18 million people – two in three Yemenis – not knowing where their next meal will come from.International food assistance, most of which is provided by WFP with 6 to 7 million persons reached every month across the country, has been critical in preventing the country from descending into a full-blown famine, but, according to Mr. Beasley, “in the face of growing obstacles and risks, we are now reaching the limit”.Though the agency intends to scale up its capacity in order to reach up to 8 million people per month, the Head of WFP warns that “if the conflict continues to intensify and economic conditions further deteriorate, we could well see the number of severely food-insecure Yemenis increasing to 12 million”, he said, explaining that “with limited access, escalating insecurity and further damage to the country’s infrastructure” the organisation’s ability to deliver assistance to this number of people would be “extremely challenging”.Noting that the targeting of humanitarian workers or humanitarian assets and infrastructure “should have no place in Yemen or anywhere in the world”, Mr. Beasley denounced “a spate of attacks, unwitting or otherwise” on WFP’s workers, trucks, warehouses and the silos holding the grain, which are “neutral and should be off limits to anybody involved in this conflict.”Mr. Beasley also highlighted the fact that “with multiple major humanitarian emergencies across the globe”, the financial brunt of the Yemen crisis is becoming “a major challenge for the international community.”Warning that “time is running out for aid agencies in Yemen to prevent this country from slipping into a devastating famine,” the Head of WFP called for new entry points for humanitarian and commercial food imports and a free-flow of commercial and humanitarian food inside the country.“I urge all parties to the conflict to meet their obligations to protect civilians and civilian infrastructure and take active steps to respect international humanitarian law by ending the conflict and bringing the peace that Yemen so desperately needs”. read more

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Holy grail blood test could detect cancer long before tumours develop

The breakthrough is being hailed as a major step towards the “holy grail” of curing cancer after trials on 1,400 patients found the simple procedure worked with up to 90 per cent accuracy. Experts said the findings could pave the way for an almost universal NHS screening programme that could detect warning signs of disease long before it developed, vastly improving survival chances. A new blood test able to detect 10 types of cancer years before a person falls ill could become available on the NHS within five years, scientists say. Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England, said such breakthroughs were part of major changes which “would unlock enormous survival gains” across the health service…. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Obama I have a deeply held preference for peaceful solutions

first_imghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y52LeaK6tHAYouTube: WhiteHouse.govUS PRESIDENT BARACK Obama has said it is too early to say if a Russian plan to secure Syria’s chemical weapons could forestall US air strikes, but vowed to give diplomacy a chance.In a somber national address, Obama warned that for reasons of national security and humanitarian decency, war-weary Americans could not simply look away after innocent children were gassed to death in an attack last month outside Damascus.And he vowed to keep the US Navy on station off the Syrian coast to keep up the pressure on President Bashar al-Assad’s regime while the diplomatic track is allowed to develop.Obama spoke on national television in the East Room of the White House as his administration works to flesh out a Russian-led plan to put Syria’s chemical arms under international supervision.“It’s too early to tell whether this offer will succeed, and any agreement must verify that the Assad regime keeps its commitments,” Obama said, from the same spot where he announced the death of Osama bin Laden in 2011.“But this initiative has the potential to remove the threat of chemical weapons without the use of force, particularly because Russia is one of Assad’s strongest allies,” Obama said.The president said that it was simply not an option for America not to respond to the August 21 chemical weapons attack, which Washington says killed 1,400 people.“When dictators commit atrocities, they depend on the world to look the other way until those horrifying pictures fade from memory,” Obama said.‘The US military doesn’t do pinpricks’“But these things happened. The facts cannot be denied. The question now is what the United States of America and the international community is prepared to do about it.“Because what happened to those people, to those children, is not only a violation of international law, it’s also a danger to our security.”Obama said he understood after the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq that Americans were weary of costly conflicts abroad — and said he was more interested in ending wars than beginning new ones.But he said that if America did not act, chemical weapons would be used again in flagrant violations of international law.And amid confusion about the extent of any US military strike, he said that Assad would pay a heavy price if military action was used.“The US military doesn’t do pinpricks. Even a limited strike will send a message to Assad that no other nation can deliver,” Obama said.The president said he would work with Russian President Vladimir Putin to pursue a diplomatic end to the crisis, as well as with US allies France and Britain.And he said that he had also asked Congress not to vote his request to authorize military action for now, as he wanted to give diplomacy a chance.Obama also gave an assurance that there would be no military force used until United Nations inspectors have delivered their report into what happened on August 21.- © AFP, 2013Read: France to submit resolution on Syria chemical weapons to UNlast_img read more

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Nintendo 3DS sortie en France au mois de mars 2011

first_imgNintendo 3DS : sortie en France au mois de mars 2011France – Nintendo a affirmé que sa DS version 3D serait disponible début 2011. Après une sortie au Japon en février, elle envahira le reste du monde et en particulier l’Europe au mois de mars.Si vous pensiez offrir la nouvelle DS à Noël, il va visiblement falloir trouver une autre idée. Nintendo a confirmé aujourd’hui que sa 3DS serait seulement disponible au premier trimestre 2011. La console sortira sur le marché japonais en février, avant d’investir l’Europe et l’Amérique du Nord en mars. L’un de ses deux écrans permettra de voir les images en relief sans lunettes spéciales. Actuellement victime de ses résultats moyens en 2010, Nintendo voit en la Nintendo 3DS un moyen de sortir d’une mini crise due aux variations défavorables des taux de change. Vendue 220 euros au pays du soleil levant, la console risque d’attirer les foules, les premiers exemplaires étant considérés comme des pièces de collection.Le 29 septembre 2010 à 12:06 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Tout savoir sur leG8 qui souvre demain

first_imgTout savoir sur l’e-G8 qui s’ouvre demainDemain s’ouvrira pour la toute première fois l'”e-G8″ ou G8 de l’Internet, à Paris. Un sommet d’un nouveau genre qui doit durer deux jours, consacré aux nouvelles technologies et voulu par le président de la République, Nicolas Sarkozy. L’”e-G8″, késako ?Selon le programme officiel envoyé le 17 mai aux journalistes, “l’e-G8 Forum est une plateforme d’expression dans laquelle tous les acteurs du monde de l’Internet vont pouvoir débattre afin d’enrichir de manière pertinente la discussion des chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement du G8 qui se rassembleront à Deauville pour discuter de ce sujet”. Le forum se déroulera au Jardin des Tuileries de Paris, sous une grande tente déployée pour l’occasion le long de la rue de Rivoli.Son objectif ? “Eclairer et nourrir la discussion des chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement du G8 d’une vision des acteurs du web sur l’importance et l’impact d’Internet dans la société et l’économie”. Ainsi, une petite délégation de participants remettra des propositions concrètes à ceux qui seront présents au G8 classique. Les chefs d’Etat des huit pays les plus puissants de la planète se réuniront en effet à Deauville en fin de semaine, les 26 et 27 mai.Quels acteurs du web seront présents ?Toujours selon le programme officiel, le forum doit réunir “les leaders mondiaux de l’écosystème numérique, appartenant à tous les domaines : dirigeants d’entreprises des secteurs des technologies (opérateurs et équipementiers), des médias, de la publicité, de la musique, des institutions, des ONG et du spectacle; experts des technologies, investisseurs et entrepreneurs; scientifiques et innovateurs, bloggeurs, penseurs et chercheurs”.Les personnalités les plus attendues (qui ont confirmé leur présence) sont les poids lourds Mark Zuckerberg, fondateur et patron du réseau social Facebook ; Eric Schmidt, président de Google ; Jeffrey Bezos, PDG d’Amazon ; Rupert Murdoch, président de News Corp. ; ou encore Xavier Niel, fondateur d’Iliad (Free) (voir la liste complète en téléchargeant le fichier PDF (lien non disponible)).Maurice Lévy, président du directoire de Publicis Groupe, présidera cet e-G8. Quels sujets seront abordés en particulier ?Le forum doit se concentrer principalement sur “l’impact de l’Internet sur l’économie : croissance, création d’emploi, création de valeur, transformation et modernisation des métiers et industries traditionnelles par la rupture technologique”. Au grand dam des internautes qui attendaient surtout une mise à plat des politiques de respect de la vie privée ou de gouvernance du web. Ces questions, tout comme la propriété intellectuelle ou les droits de l’homme, seront abordées, mais l’essentiel des discussions tourneront très certainement autour de l’aspect économique. Ainsi, le programme précise que “l’e-G8 Forum s’interrogera enfin sur les bonnes pratiques, les nouveaux usages et modèles économiques, ainsi que les technologies de rupture qui feront l’Internet de demain” (avenir du e-commerce, révolution du web mobile).Comment vont se dérouler ces deux jours ?À lire aussiSéisme, Google et chargeur, les actus sciences que vous devez connaître ce 22 juinDemain matin, Nicolas Sarkozy doit inaugurer le forum, après une introduction de Maurice Lévy, PDG de Publicis et président de l’événement. Puis, durant ces deux journées, “des sessions plénières aborderont l’Internet et la croissance économique sous toutes ses formes, qu’il s’agisse de l’impact de l’Internet sur la société, les loisirs, les marchés, les modes de communication ou encore l’éducation”, précise le communiqué officiel. Par ailleurs, d’autres séances plénières seront organisées pour traiter “des questions d’innovation et de l’avenir d’Internet, la propriété intellectuelle”. Outre ces sessions, des table-rondes aborderont “les start-up, l’impact de l’Internet sur la presse, le partage des valeurs, la e-gouvernance ou la mobilité”. Un forum qui suscite des critiquesLa Quadrature du Net, organisation de défense des droits et libertés des citoyens sur Internet, dénonce dans un article publié le 18 mai”un écran de fumée pour le contrôle gouvernemental du Net”. L’organisation ajoute : “Nous sommes à un moment crucial de l’histoire où les citoyens doivent se mobiliser pour garder le contrôle d’un Internet ouvert et universel”.Avec d’autres organisations, la Quadrature du Net invite les internautes à venir exprimer leur créativité sur un site Internet créé à l’occasion : G8 vs. Internet. Néanmoins, ce forum qui réunit autant d’acteurs de premier plan pour parler de l’Internet reste un évènement rare. Il peut réserver de bonnes surprises si les sujets des débats sont choisis de manière judicieuse.Le 23 mai 2011 à 11:23 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Wifes tip led FBI to Vancouver threats suspect

first_imgVANCOUVER — A Vancouver man accused of sending letters containing white powder to members of Congress fell under FBI scrutiny after his wife told an officer that he laced the envelopes with a mixture of celery salt and corn starch.The FBI focused on Christopher Lee Carlson, 39, after a Vancouver police officer told them about a March 4 interview she had with Carlson’s wife about Carlson’s recent emotional turmoil, The Oregonian reported.On March 9, a federal grand jury in Portland indicted Carlson on charges that he mailed threatening letters to Republican House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio and Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland.The two counts arose from an investigation into the mailing of about 100 envelopes containing white powder. The U.S. attorney’s office in Portland said the letters, postmarked in Portland, have tested negative for toxic substances.Carlson, a nurse, is expected to be arraigned this week.Investigators have recovered dozens of letters addressed to U.S. senators and representatives. The Seattle office of Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said it also received one of the letters.last_img read more

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City of Camas to appoint new councilor Monday

first_imgCAMAS — The Camas City Council will hold a special meeting Monday to replace Linda Dietzman, who is resigning at the end of the month.City Administrator Pete Capell said four finalists for Dietzman’s position are Bonita Carter, Randy Curtis, Patricia Jensen and Matthew McBride. Capell didn’t share background information about the candidates, but added that they will interview for the job Monday night before the councilors make their selection. The new councilor will serve from Feb. 1 to Dec. 7, when Dietzman’s term was set to expire. In November, the position will come up for election again. Dietzman, now nearing the end of her third term, announced last year that she would step down. After 11 years in the position, she’s become one of the council’s longest-serving members. The meeting starts at 4:30 p.m. at City Hall, 616 N.E. Fourth Ave. in Camas.last_img read more

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