Archers target finals

first_imgChinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Ben Mbala, a cinch for the season Most Valuable Player award, has a tough customer in fellow Cameroonian Papi Sarr on the low blocks while the speedy La Salle backcourt of Kib Montalbo, Aljun Melecio, Thomas Torres and Andrei Caracut has met its match with the Falcons’ small ball.“We had beaten them twice but I tell you they’re really competitive,” said Ayo. “We respect them and we will prepare hard for this game to advance to the championship.”The Archers are on a collision course with archrivals Ateneo Blue Eagles, who also gained a twice-to-beat bonus in their Final Four duel with No. 3 Far Eastern U Tamaraws this Saturday.Jerrick Ahanmisi, the projected Rookie of the Year, and Sean Manganti can neutralize La Salle’s patented mayhem basketball with their athleticism along with spitfire Robbie Manalang and veteran Dawn Ochea.Perhaps the best guy on the floor that could create problems for the Falcons is Jeron Teng, who always answers the call whenever the Archers are in trouble.ADVERTISEMENT EDITORS’ PICK Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “This is just part of our journey. We were able to embrace and accept what were supposed to do that’s why we’re here,” said Pumaren. “I just hope we will continue with this journey.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next La Salle can confuse its opponents with an overkill of offensive schemes on any given day.The Green Archers will throw the full weight of that sophisticated weaponry as they attempt to knock out the Adamson Falcons in the Final Four of the UAAP Season 79 men’s basketball at Mall of Asia Arena today.ADVERTISEMENT Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are youngcenter_img Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Dalisay thru as three other Pinoys exit “We have 74 different plays and I’m talking about offense only,” said La Salle head coach Aldin Ayo. “We have a play for every situation on the floor and it would require a lot of focus from my players.”They’ll certainly need those against an Adamson five that thrives on a nothing-to-lose mentality.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“Nobody expected us to be here,” said Adamson coach Franz Pumaren, the former La Salle coach who lost twice to his alma mater this season. “With this opportunity, might as well make the most out of it.”But while their first meeting was a complete blowout, the fourth-ranked Falcons nearly had the No. 1 Archers by the neck in the second encounter.And though the Archers are armed with a twice-to-beat edge and can book the first championship spot in a potential showdown with archrival Ateneo in the Finals, the Falcons definitely have the manpower to cancel them out. PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

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Puan, the world’s oldest Sumatran orangutan, dies at 62

first_imgPuan, the world’s oldest living Sumatran orangutan, was euthanized on June 18 at Perth Zoo in Australia due to age-related complications.Her death left an incredible legacy of 11 children and a total of 54 descendants across the world, accounting for nearly 10 percent of the global Sumatran orangutan zoo population.Due to her genetic legacy, Puan played a vital role in ensuring the survival of the species, which has been categorized as critically endangered. JAKARTA — Puan, the world’s oldest living Sumatran orangutan, has died at an Australian zoo after a lifetime spent in service to the conservation of the critically endangered species.Officials at Perth Zoo, where Puan had lived for the past 50 years, euthanized her on June 18, citing age-related health complications. She was 62 years old.Her death left an “incredible legacy” of 11 children and a total of 54 descendants in Australia, Europe, the United States and in the jungles of Sumatra, accounting for nearly a tenth of the global zoo population of Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii), according to a statement from Perth Zoo.Due to her genetic legacy, Puan played a vital role in ensuring the survival of the heavily threatened species. Of the nine existing wild populations of Sumatran orangutans, only seven — each with an estimated 250 or more individuals — have prospects of long-term viability, according to WWF. Only three of those population groups have more than 1,000 orangutans each.Some 29 of Puan’s descendants are still alive, including daughters Puteri and Pulang; grandchildren Utama, Teliti, Sekara and Lestari; and great-grandson Sungai, all of whom are also at Perth Zoo.At 62, Puan exceeded the usual life expectancy for her species. In the wild, female orangutans would rarely live past the age of 50, assuming they succumb earlier to a number of threats such as poaching.“Puan is the total exception to the rule,” Holly Thompson, a primate superviser at Perth Zoo, said in a video posted on the zoo’s Facebook page. “To be 62 years old is an amazing age for a Sumatran orangutan.”One of Puan’s great-grandsons, Nyaru, was the latest in the line to be released into the wild.“I think it’s an amazing legacy for her great grandson Nyaru to be out living his life in the jungles of Sumatra, where his great grandmother hailed from,” zookeeper Martina Hart wrote in an op-ed in the West Australian.But Puan’s long life and legacy of descendants weren’t the only remarkable things about her. She was said to have motherly mannerisms that befitted her name, which means “lady” in Indonesian, with many describing her as the “grand old lady” of Perth Zoo.It was her journey and demeanor that made such an impact in people’s hearts.“[T]he lady we know as Puan is so much more than statistics,” Hart wrote. “To look at Puan is to look into the eyes of an animal (and I find even saying ‘animal’ to feel slightly disrespectful) who has seen so much in her lifetime that the mind boggles.”Puan, the world’s oldest known Sumatran orangutan. Photo by Derick Smith/Perth Zoo.Puan was born in the jungle of Sumatra in 1956. On New Year’s Eve in 1968, she was gifted to the zoo by a sultan from Malaysia.“She really has seen it all, from the jungles of the wild to the old exhibits here at Perth, to our now world class exhibits,” wrote Hart, who knew Puan for almost 18 years. “It fascinates me as to the stories she could tell.”Despite spending half a century in a zoo environment, Puan never lost her natural and motherly instincts. Hart described her as “the maker of the most amazing nests, and the lady who took no nonsense from her children over the years, but was also the most nurturing mother we had.”Hart also fondly recalled the day the zoo gave Puan access to a giant fig tree to climb and nest in.By then, Puan hadn’t been in a real tree for over 50 years.“To be honest my eyes were filled with tears watching her climbing,” Hart said. “She was the only one who would nest in the tree itself, instead of taking branches back to the platforms to nest. Her instinct and her own mother’s teachings had never left her after all those years.”Over time, Puan’s eyelashes turned gray, her movements slowed, and her mind started to wander. After various veterinary assessments confirmed that age-related complications were adversely impacting her Puan’s ability to live a quality life, the zoo finally decided to euthanize her.“It’s very hard for us all to say goodbye to Puan,” a visibly emotional Thompson said in the video. “It’s done in an extremely calm and relaxed manner. Puan went extremely peacefully. She had people that had been working with her for a long, long time, with her to the very end.”“As hard as it was for us, it was the right thing to do,” Hart added in the video. “We’re going to miss her.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Hans Nicholas Jongcenter_img Animals, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Orangutans, Primates, Saving Species From Extinction, Wildlife, Zoos last_img read more

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Taking it slow can help reduce impacts of Arctic shipping on whales (commentary)

first_imgThanks to climate change, traveling through the Northwest Passage is quickly becoming an exotic option for cruise ship passengers — and an enticing shortcut for cargo ships.But an increasingly ice-free Arctic means more than just a chance for a new sightseeing adventure: Significantly increased ship traffic is altering the submarine calm of one of the quietest places on Earth. That could have serious implications for marine mammals and fish that rely on sound for group cohesion, socializing, finding mates, navigating, and detecting threats.As we grow sensitive to plastics and other toxins that plague ocean species, we must remember that while noise is the one form of pollution that we cannot see, we can work together to turn down the volume.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. For 19th-century adventurers like Sir John Franklin, navigating a path through the ice-choked Northwest Passage — the Holy Grail of Arctic exploration — was a treacherous and often deadly undertaking. Today, thanks to climate change, traveling through the passage is quickly becoming another exotic option for cruise ship passengers — and an enticing shortcut for cargo ships.But an increasingly ice-free Arctic means more than just a chance for a new sightseeing adventure: Significantly increased ship traffic is altering the submarine calm of one of the quietest places on Earth. That could have serious implications for marine mammals and fish that rely on sound for group cohesion, socializing, finding mates, navigating, and detecting threats.For a study just published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin, my colleagues and I sought to determine just how intrusive ship engines are on the Arctic soundscape and whether or not there are any changes ships can make to improve the aural environment for wildlife there.Marine mammals and fish make a variety of sounds for a variety of purposes. Bowhead whale songs intended to attract mates are complex and broadband. Other vocalizations (to navigate, for example) fall in a narrower range. Beluga whale vocalizations are highly variable, with tonal sounds and echolocation clicks in different sound ranges. Bearded seals also emit several different call types and fish have their own suite of grunts and pulses.Audiograms (hearing profiles) of marine mammals and fish show that their hearing ranges often overlap with those of vessel noise, which can “mask” the animal calls from their intended recipients. Think of the difficulty of hearing a friend at a noisy party compared to at the library – except that loud vessel noise can potentially mask vocalizations over a much larger area than your local library.Unfortunately, routing ships away from areas heavily used by marine mammals is often not an option in the Canadian Arctic. Most traffic there follows fixed southern routes along the mainland.Vessel transits through Canada’s Northwest Passage have increased from four per year in the 1980s to as many as 30 per year. With ship traffic steadily growing in Arctic waters, our WCS Canada research team, in close collaboration with JASCO Applied Sciences and the University of Victoria, decided to investigate whether reducing vessel speeds could lower the impact of ship noise.Map of the study region, showing the prospective sail track for future vessel traffic (red line) that was modeled, and the corresponding reduction in listening spaces expected for beluga whales with distance from those sail tracks. These maps are from a container vessel underway at 25 knots under median noise conditions (the 50th percentile ambient level between August and September 2015). Courtesy of WCS.In our study, we chose to focus on “listening space” — essentially, the volume of ocean within which the listener can detect biologically important sounds. We then measured the impact of ship noise on the size (radius) of this space.Calculating the amount by which ship noise reduces the size of an animal’s listening space requires an understanding of how well a call or sound travels through Arctic waters, the change in masking noise levels (from vessels), and the species’ audiogram. The overlap in sound frequency (perceived as “pitch”) for each of these factors is the key.Our listening areas were selected based on areas known to attract bowhead and beluga whales, as well as bearded and ringed seals (fish species were assumed to occur at all sites).We found that vessel speed reductions significantly reduced loss of listening space. Under quiet conditions, beluga whales experienced a 50 percent listening space loss when they were 7 to 14 kilometers (4.3 to 8.7 miles) away from a ship traveling at 25 knots. When ships slowed to 15 knots, whales could get as close as 2 to 4 kilometers before they experienced the same loss of listening space.In other words, when a ship was going faster, the area over which it cut a beluga’s listening space in half might be more than three times larger. This difference is important because there are many places where whales cannot distance themselves from ships in the Arctic (in the narrow Prince of Wales Strait, animals can maintain a maximum distance of just 7 to 10 kilometers).We also found that slowing vessels will have even larger benefits when ambient noise is higher and ships are farther away. This finding is especially important since ambient noise from waves and winds is increasing in an Arctic environment that is experiencing ever longer periods without sound-dampening ice.The Arctic Council has been grappling with the implications of increased shipping operations in the Arctic in areas with high marine mammal densities. Our research finds that vessel slowdowns could indeed be a viable strategy for lowering noise impacts on whales, seals, and fish, with the added benefit of reducing the likelihood of collisions.While negotiating the Northwest Passage may be less treacherous in the future for cruise ship passengers who thrill at the sight of whales plunging through Arctic waters, melting ice that opens up new sea lanes comes with a new threat for marine life. As we grow sensitive to plastics and other toxins that plague ocean species, we must remember that while noise is the one form of pollution that we cannot see, we can work together to turn down the volume.WCS Canada researchers Dr. Matt Pine and Dr. William Halliday return to shore after retrieving an underwater acoustic recorder in the Prince of Wales Strait in 2018. These recorders provide data on natural background sounds, marine mammal activity, and vocalizing fish that are uploaded directly into predictive noise effects models. Photo credit: WCS Canada.Matt Pine is Mitacs Elevate postdoctoral fellow with WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) Canada, the University of Victoria and JASCO Applied Sciences.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Arctic Animals, Climate Change, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Fish, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Noise Pollution, Researcher Perspective Series, Sea Ice, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

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