Researchers use CRISPR to create kill switch for GMOs

first_img © 2015 Phys.org GMOs have been in the news a lot of late, due to the fear by some that food produced in such a way might be harmful. Others fear that modified bacteria or viruses that make their way into the environment could prove disastrous. In this new effort, the two researchers describe a technique for adding a new functionality to GMOs—an ability to self destruct should they find themselves in the wrong environment—and central to their work is CRISPR, a means of using chemicals to modify gene fragments.CRISPR allows for snipping gene segments and replacing them with other segments, which is the central idea behind GMOs. But CRISPR can also be used to snip out gene segments without replacing them, and that is the part of the system that Caliando and Voigt sought to exploit. Their idea is to add extra abilities to GMOs, such as the ability to recognize a certain sugar. The GMO can be further programmed to launch a secondary part of the CRISPR system when such a recognition occurs, and that secondary part would involve snipping out the segment that caused the GMO to be modified in the first place, returning it to its natural state, and killing it also if desired.As an example, the researchers modified an already modified E. coli sample to cause it to recognize arabinose molecules—when it did so, it snipped out the parts of the DNA that had been inserted and set off a sequence of events that led to its own death. The team reports that after two hours, approximately 99 percent of those used in the test were dead.The researchers suggest their technique could be used by companies that make GMOs in two ways. The first would be to prevent GMOs from disrupting the natural environment while the second would be to protect trade secrets—if the gene sequences that have been inserted into an organism are snipped out before it dies, others that obtain a sample would not be able to see what genetic modifications had been made. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Targeted DNA degradation using a CRISPR device stably carried in the host genome, Nature Communications 6, Article number: 6989 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7989AbstractOnce an engineered organism completes its task, it is useful to degrade the associated DNA to reduce environmental release and protect intellectual property. Here we present a genetically encoded device (DNAi) that responds to a transcriptional input and degrades user-defined DNA. This enables engineered regions to be obscured when the cell enters a new environment. DNAi is based on type-IE CRISPR biochemistry and a synthetic CRISPR array defines the DNA target(s). When the input is on, plasmid DNA is degraded 108-fold. When the genome is targeted, this causes cell death, reducing viable cells by a factor of 108. Further, the CRISPR nuclease can direct degradation to specific genomic regions (for example, engineered or inserted DNA), which could be used to complicate recovery and sequencing efforts. DNAi can be stably carried in an engineered organism, with no impact on cell growth, plasmid stability or DNAi inducibility even after passaging for >2 months. Citation: Researchers use CRISPR to create ‘kill switch’ for GMOs (2015, May 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-05-crispr-gmos.html CRISPR/Cas-derived technology offers the ability to dive into the genome and make a very precise change.center_img (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers at MIT has developed what amounts to a “kill switch” for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, Brian Caliando and Christopher Voigt describe the process they developed and how it might impact the development and use of GMOs. Journal information: Nature Communications Researchers find the genome of the cultivated sweet potato has bacterial DNA Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Analysis of eradicated European strain of malaria parasite offers insight into the

first_imgThis thin film Giemsa stained micrograph reveals a mature Plasmodium vivax trophozoite. P. vivax trophozoites show amoeboid cytoplasm, large chromatin dots, and fine, yellowish-brown pigment. RBCs are enlarged 1 1/2 – 2X, and may be distorted. If visible, Schüffner’s dots may appear finer than those seen in P. vivax. Credit: CDC/ Steven Glenn (Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has conducted a DNA analysis of malaria parasites found in blood samples taken from infected people in a part of Europe and put onto slides during World War II—in so doing, they have added more information to the historical profile of the parasite that causes malaria. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their analysis of the parasite samples and what they learned. Malaria is a disease caused by a protozoan parasite that takes up residence in a victim’s red blood cells—transmitted by mosquitoes, it is responsible for the millions of deaths and untold suffering. Efforts to eradicate the parasite from all parts of the world have so far proved unsuccessful, though it has been eradicated in some regions, including Europe and the U.S. As part of an effort to rid the world of the deadly parasite, some researchers have been attempting to look into its past to spot a weakness, or at least to better understand how it evolves. Some research results have also suggested that the dispersal patterns of malaria are due to human movements between continents, which has caused some researchers to wonder if the migrations of people have somehow played a role in both its continued existence and the harm it causes.In this new effort, the researchers came into possession of some slides with blood stains on them that had been taken from infected people in Spain during World War II—since malaria has since been eradicated in that area, the blood stains offered an opportunity to learn more about a strain that predates those that exist today. The researchers first conducted tests to identify the strains present in the samples; after that, they reconstructed the genomes of the two strains present, which allowed them to conduct phylogenetic analyses. They report that they found three mutations that offered evidence of dominant strains of the parasite being carried to South America from Europe not long after explorers arrived; further, they represent the closest modern representative of ancestral Eurasian stock. The study and its findings are likely to kick off a renewed effort to comb other medical collections to see if other slides might be found offering more historical data as the effort continues to wipe out malaria and the parasite that causes it completely. Explore further Highly sensitive detection of malaria parasites Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencescenter_img More information: Pere Gelabert et al. Mitochondrial DNA from the eradicated Europeanandfrom 70-year-old slides from the Ebro Delta in Spain, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1611017113AbstractPhylogenetic analysis of Plasmodium parasites has indicated that their modern-day distribution is a result of a series of human-mediated dispersals involving transport between Africa, Europe, America, and Asia. A major outstanding question is the phylogenetic affinity of the malaria causing parasites Plasmodium vivax and falciparum in historic southern Europe—where it was endemic until the mid-20th century, after which it was eradicated across the region. Resolving the identity of these parasites will be critical for answering several hypotheses on the malaria dispersal. Recently, a set of slides with blood stains of malaria-affected people from the Ebro Delta (Spain), dated between 1942 and 1944, have been found in a local medical collection. We extracted DNA from three slides, two of them stained with Giemsa (on which Plasmodium parasites could still be seen under the microscope) and another one consisting of dried blood spots. We generated the data using Illumina sequencing after using several strategies aimed at increasing the Plasmodium DNA yield: depletion of the human genomic (g)DNA content through hybridization with human gDNA baits, and capture-enrichment using gDNA derived from P. falciparum. Plasmodium mitochondrial genome sequences were subsequently reconstructed from the resulting data. Phylogenetic analysis of the eradicated European P. vivax mtDNA genome indicates that the European isolate is closely related to the most common present-day American haplotype and likely entered the American continent post-Columbian contact. Furthermore, the European P. falciparum mtDNA indicates a link with current Indian strains that is in agreement with historical accounts. © 2016 Phys.org Citation: Analysis of eradicated European strain of malaria parasite offers insight into the history of the disease (2016, September 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-09-analysis-eradicated-european-strain-malaria.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Proposed test would offer strongest evidence yet that the quantum state is

first_img © 2017 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Physicists are getting a little bit closer to answering one of the oldest and most basic questions of quantum theory: does the quantum state represent reality or just our knowledge of reality? Currently, the best experimental data shows that the amount of error improvement that can be attributed to overlap is about 69%. In the new paper, Knee has proposed a way to reduce this value to less than 50% with current technology. As he explains, this would mean that “overlap is doing less than half of the necessary work in explaining the indistinguishability of non-orthogonal quantum states.” “The greatest significance of the work is the new knowledge about how to conduct experiments that can show the reality of the quantum state,” Knee told Phys.org. “The big bonuses are that experimentalists will now be able to do more with less: that is, make tighter and tighter restrictions on the possible interpretations of quantum mechanics with fewer experimental resources. These experiments typically require heroic efforts, but the theoretical progress should mean that they are now possible with cheaper equipment and in less time.”To achieve such an improvement, Knee’s work addresses one of the biggest challenges in this type of test, which is to identify the types of states and measurements that optimize the error improvement. This is a very high-dimensional optimization problem—with at least 72 variables, it is extremely difficult to solve using conventional optimization methods. Knee showed that a much better approach to this type of optimization problem is to convert it into a problem that can be studied with convex programming methods. To search for the best combinations of variables, he applied techniques from convex optimization theory, alternately optimizing one variable and then the other until the optimal values of both converge. This strategy ensures that the results are “partially optimal,” meaning that no change in just one of the variables could provide a better solution. And no matter how optimal a result is, Knee explains that it may never be possible to rule out the epistemic view entirely.”There will always be wriggle room!” he said. “Certainly with the techniques known to us at the present time, a small amount of epistemic overlap can always be maintained, because experiments must be finished in a finite amount of time, and always suffer from a little bit of noise. That is to say nothing of the more wacky loopholes that a staunch epistemicist could try and jump through: for example, one can usually appeal to retrocausality or unfair sampling to get around the results of any ‘experimental metaphysics.’ Nevertheless, I believe that showing the quantum state must be at least 50% real is an achievable goal that most reasonable people would not be able to wriggle out of accepting.”One especially surprising and encouraging result of the new approach is that it shows that mixed states could work better for supporting the ontic view than pure states could. Typically, mixed states are considered more epistemic and lower-performing than pure states in many quantum information processing applications. Knee’s work shows that one of the advantages of the mixed states is that they are extremely robust to noise, which suggests that experiments do not need nearly as high a precision as previously thought to demonstrate the reality of the quantum state.”I very much hope that experimentalists will be able to use the recipes that I have found in the near future,” Knee said. “It is likely that the general technique that I developed would benefit from some tweaking to tailor it to a particular experimental setup (for example, ions in traps, photons or superconducting systems). There is also scope for further theoretical improvements to the technique, such as combining it with other known theoretical approaches and introducing extra constraints to learn something of the general structure of the epistemic interpretation. The holy grail from a theoretical point of view would be to find the best possible experimental recipes and prove that they are as much! That is something I will continue to work on.” Framing the question in terms of overlap offers a way to test the two perspectives. If physicists can show that the indistinguishability of quantum states can somehow be explained by reality and not overlap, then that places tighter restrictions on the epistemic view and makes the ontic view more plausible.A key to such tests is that the task of discriminating between two states always has a small error involved. Having complete, omniscient knowledge about reality should improve state discrimination. But by how much? This is the big question, and physicists are trying to show that the value of this “improvement due to the increased reality of the quantum states” is very large. This would mean that the overlap plays very little, if any, role in explaining why states are indistinguishable. It’s not simply that physicists cannot accurately prepare the true state of reality, it’s that the indistinguishability must be thought of as a fundamental property of the quantum states themselves. (Left) When there is zero overlap between two quantum states’ distributions, then a particle is really occupying two states at once (ontic interpretation). (Right) When there is some overlap, the particle may exist in a state in the overlapping area, and so it may appear to be in two states at once (epistemic interpretation). Credit: Knee, IOP Publishing Researchers describe the wavefunction of Schroedinger’s cat More information: George C. Knee. “Towards optimal experimental tests on the reality of the quantum state.” New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/aa54ab Explore further A new algorithm could lead to experiments that provide the strongest evidence yet that the quantum state is real. Credit: Knee, IOP Publishing George C. Knee, a theoretical physicist at the University of Oxford and the University of Warwick, has created an algorithm for designing optimal experiments that could provide the strongest evidence yet that the quantum state is an ontic state (a state of reality) and not an epistemic state (a state of knowledge). Knee has published a paper on the new strategy in a recent issue of the New Journal of Physics.While physicists have debated about the nature of the quantum state since the early days of quantum theory (with, most famously, Bohr being in favor of the ontic interpretation and Einstein arguing for the epistemic one), most modern evidence has supported the view that the quantum state does indeed represent reality.Philosophically, this interpretation can be hard to swallow, as it means that the many counterintuitive features of quantum theory are properties of reality, and not due to limitations of theory. One of the most notable of these features is superposition. Before a quantum object is measured, quantum theory says that the object simultaneously exists in more than one state, each with a particular probability. If these states are ontic, it means that a particle really does occupy two states at once, not merely that it appears that way due to our limited ability to prepare particles, as in the epistemic view.What is exactly meant by a limited ability to prepare particles? To understand this, Knee explains that different quantum states must be thought of as distributions over the possible true states of reality. If there is some overlap between these distributions, then the states of reality in which a particle can be prepared is limited.Currently it’s not clear if there actually is any overlap between quantum state distributions. If there is zero overlap, then the particle must really be occupying two states at once, which is the ontic view. On the other hand, if there is some overlap, then it’s possible that the particle exists in a state in the overlapping area, and we just can’t tell the difference between the two possibilities due to the overlap. This is the epistemic view, and it removes some of the oddness of superposition by explaining that the indistinguishability of two states is a result of overlap (and human limitation) rather than of reality. Journal information: New Journal of Physics Citation: Proposed test would offer strongest evidence yet that the quantum state is real (2017, February 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-02-strongest-evidence-quantum-state-real.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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New superglue allows for bonding stretchable hydrogels

first_img Demonstration of flexing, curling, stretching and compressing of the hydrogel with sensors and actuators. Credit: Soft Electronics Laboratory, Linz Institute of Technology Citation: New superglue allows for bonding stretchable hydrogels (2017, July 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-07-superglue-bonding-stretchable-hydrogels.html The hydrogel electronic skin. Hydrogels can transport liquids to and from the skin, for example supplying water-soluble medication or removing sweat. Credit: Soft Electronics Laboratory, Linz Institute of Technology The hydrogel e-skin is controlled and data is read out continuously via a mobile phone, here mounted on a custom-made stretching unit with all heaters activated. Credit: Soft Electronics Laboratory, Linz Institute of Technology More information: Daniela Wirthl et al. Instant tough bonding of hydrogels for soft machines and electronics, Science Advances (2017). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700053AbstractIntroducing methods for instant tough bonding between hydrogels and antagonistic materials—from soft to hard—allows us to demonstrate elastic yet tough biomimetic devices and machines with a high level of complexity. Tough hydrogels strongly attach, within seconds, to plastics, elastomers, leather, bone, and metals, reaching unprecedented interfacial toughness exceeding 2000 J/m2. Healing of severed ionic hydrogel conductors becomes feasible and restores function instantly. Soft, transparent multilayered hybrids of elastomers and ionic hydrogels endure biaxial strain with more than 2000% increase in area, facilitating soft transducers, generators, and adaptive lenses. We demonstrate soft electronic devices, from stretchable batteries, self-powered compliant circuits, and autonomous electronic skin for triggered drug delivery. Our approach is applicable in rapid prototyping and in delicate environments inaccessible for extended curing and cross-linking. A hydrogel electronic skin worn on a human wrist with continuous control and data logging via a mobile phone. The hydrogel smart skin consists of a flexible and reusable unit bearing power supply, control, readout and wireless communication, and a stretchable, disposable transducer batch with four heating elements and temperature sensors. Hydrogels can transport liquids to and from the skin, for example supplying water-soluble medication or removing sweat. Credit: Soft Electronics Laboratory, Linz Institute of Technology Hydrogels, as the name suggests, are materials made mainly out of water. They are typically rubbery and are often elastic. Many of them have been developed to allow for the creation of materials that are more like those found in living creatures. Some examples include soft contact lenses, soft bone replacement in the vertebrae and even jelly-like robots. But one thing that has been holding back more advanced applications is the inability to glue or bond hydrogels with other objects in ways that allow for bending or stretching, or even for attaching well to hard objects. In this new effort, the researchers report they have developed a glue that solves this problem.The researchers started by investigating the possibility of using superglue, the common household adhesive. But they found it would not work because when it dries, it becomes hard—that means that when two stretchy materials are bonded together, the glue cracks when both are stretched. That led them to conclude that what was needed was a non-solvent—a material that would not dissolve into the glue and would prevent it from becoming hard. The result, the team reports, is a glue made with cyanoacrylates (the adherents in superglue) diluted with a non-solvent. When it is applied to two surfaces, the researchers explain, it diffuses into their outer layers and is triggered to polymerize by the water content, such as in a hydrogel. Put another way, they say that the glue becomes tangled with the polymer chains in a gel, creating a very tight bond—and thus far, it has worked really well. © 2017 Phys.org The pictures show a peeling test, with a hydrogel (green) instantly tough bonded to a PMMA (Polymethylmethacrylat) substrate. A liner serves as stiff backing. Cracking in the hydrogel occurs perpendicular to the peeling direction. Credit: Soft Electronics Laboratory, Linz Institute of Technology New way to reduce skin scarring relies on a glue-like substance secreted by mussels (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Johannes Kepler University Linz has developed a new type of glue that can be used to bond hydrogels to other hard or soft objects. In their paper published on the open-access site Science Advances, the group explains their development process, the structure of the glue, how it works and in what ways. The hydrogel electronic skin. Hydrogels can transport liquids to and from the skin, for example supplying water-soluble medication or removing sweat. Credit: Soft Electronics Laboratory, Linz Institute of Technology The pictures show a peeling test, with a hydrogel (green) instantly tough bonded to a PMMA (Polymethylmethacrylat) substrate. A liner serves as stiff backing. Cracking in the hydrogel occurs perpendicular to the peeling direction. Credit: Soft Electronics Laboratory, Linz Institute of Technology Journal information: Science Advances The team has tested their glue on a variety of products—gluing a hydrogel to a vertebrae model, for example. They found that it would also bond especially well with an elastomer. They used their glue to create a patch of electronic skin upon which they were able to glue such things as a processor, battery and temperature sensor. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Researchers detect beryllium in the fast nova ASASSN16kt

first_img Study confirms that stellar novae are the main source of lithium in the universe ASASSN-16kt, also known as V407 Lup, was a fast oxygen-neon (ONe) nova some 33,000 light years away, detected by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) as a bright source on September 24, 2016. Two days later, it reached a maximum magnitude of 6.3 (in V-band) and started to decay rapidly.Izzo’s team commenced observational campaign of ASASSN-16kt shortly after its discovery. For their observations they employed the UVES and X-Shooter spectrographs at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, as well as the PUC High Echelle Resolution Optical Spectrograph (PUCHEROS) mounted on the ESO 0.5 m telescope located at the Observatory of Pontificia Universidad Catolica (OUC) in Chile.These observations allowed the astronomers to reveal the existence of beryllium (Be) in ASASSN-16kt, among other elements.”We present high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the fast nova ASASSN-16kt (V407 Lup). A close inspection of spectra obtained at early stages has revealed the presence of low-ionization lines, and among the others we have identified the presence of the ionized 7Be doublet in a region relatively free from possible contaminants,” the researchers wrote in the paper.The authors calculated that ASASSN-16kt has produced between 5.9 and 7.7-billionths of a solar mass of 7Be. Furthermore, they spotted bright neon (Ne) lines, what may indicate that the nova progenitor is a massive (about 1.2 solar masses) oxygen-neon white dwarf.During advanced phases of red giant stars, the reaction of two isotopes of helium (He) – 3He with 4He can give rise to the 7Be isotope, which decays only through electron capture into lithium (Li) after a half-time decay of about 53 days. Thus, the finding of beryllium could be important to the understanding of novae in general. According to the study, the detection of 7Be, which decays completely into 7Li through electron capture in the early spectra of ASASSN-16kt, further confirms that novae represent the main Li-factories in our Milky Way galaxy.”These findings imply that classical novae produced a huge quantity of Li, more than the value of 150 solar masses of Li estimated to be in the Milky Way,” the paper reads.However, the researcher emphasized that still more studies are required to fully understand the role of novae in lithium production. They added that future studies should focus on more precise characterization of beryllium and lithium mass produced during a nova outburst as a function of the progenitor white dwarf mass.”Additional detections of 7Be II and/or 7Li combined with a detailed study of the ejecta properties, like its degree of asphericity, are needed to quantify the nova Galactic yield, and then to infer the presence of mechanisms acting during the TNR [thermo-nuclear runaway], or in the nova ejecta, that can deplete freshly-formed Li, and finally explain the over-abundances of Li observed in young stellar populations,” the scientists concluded. © 2018 Phys.org An international team of researchers led by Luca Izzo of the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia, Spain, has conducted high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the fast nova ASASSN-16kt. The study, which resulted in detection of beryllium in this nova, appeared February 16 on arXiv.org. Explore further ASASSN-16kt spectrum at Day 8. The figure displays the spectrum around Be ii λ3130 (black line), Na i λ5890 (green line), Fe ii λ5169 (blue line) and Ca ii λ3933 (red line) plotted on the velocity scale. Credit: Izzo et al., 2018. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Researchers detect beryllium in the fast nova ASASSN-16kt (2018, February 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-beryllium-fast-nova-asassn-16kt.html More information: Beryllium detection in the very fast nova ASASSN-16kt (V407 Lupi). arxiv.org/pdf/1802.05896.pdflast_img read more

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KMC unveils new primary health centre at Ward 50 in Santosh Mitra

first_imgKolkata: The Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) on Thursday unveiled a new primary health centre at ward 50 at Santosh Mitra Square in Central Kolkata on Thursday. “We will be introducing tertiary healthcare facilities at this health unit in a few months’ time. We are in the process of procuring state of the art machines for conducting advanced and expensive blood tests,” Member Mayor-in-Council (Health) Atin Ghosh said while inaugurating the centre. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsIt may be mentioned that presently like any other health unit of the KMC, this unit will have facilities for minor operations, basic blood tests and treatment of diseases like dengue and malaria. “The health unit under National Urban Health Mission will deal with the treatment of both communicable and non communicable diseases. “We will be soon introducing thyroid, cholesterol, kidney and liver test facilities. We are in the process of procuring some advanced machines which will be available in a months’ time,” Ghosh said. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThis will be beneficial to the common people as tests at these health centres will be conducted for free of cost whereas blood tests in other centres for thyroid, cholesterol, kidney and liver will be expensive.”We are also planning to include facilities of anti-rabies vaccine at a number of health centres,” he added.It may be mentioned that in the present year, KMC health department has catered to 60 percent more patients in comparison to the year 2016-17. “This is a clear indication that more and more people are visiting our health centres for treatment,” a senior official of KMC’s health department said.last_img read more

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Good nights sleep strengthens memory

first_imgEnsure proper sleep if you want to boost your memory as brain activity during sleep sorts through several experiences we encounter every day and retains only important information in memory pockets, say researchers.The findings showed that patterns of brain activity that occur during the day are replayed at fast-forward speed during sleep.The key result is that sleep replay strengthens the microscopic connections between nerve cells that are active — a process deemed critical for consolidating memories. “These findings are about the fundamental processes that occur in the brain during the consolidation of memory during sleep,” said lead researcher Jack Mellor from University of Bristol in a paper published in the journal Cell Reports. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The new discoveries provide further evidence for the benefits of a good night’s sleep. Good sleep is important because the bad night sleep often experienced by both the healthy population and people with schizophrenia or Alzheimer’s disease lead to impaired mental function.“It also seems that the successful replay of brain activity during sleep is dependent on the emotional state of the person when they are learning. This has major implications for how we teach and enable people to learn effectively,” Mellor said.last_img read more

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Rashtriya Sanskriti Mahotsav2016

first_imgMinistry of Culture, Government of India announced the second edition of ‘Rashtriya Sanskriti Mahotsav-2016’ recently, which is to be held in the premises of the Indira Gandhi National Center for the Arts (IGNCA) from October 15 to 23.The Rashtriya Sanskriti Mahotsav was conceived with an intent to showcase the rich cultural heritage of the country in all its rich and varied dimensions – Handicrafts, Cuisine, Painting, Sculpture, Photography, Documentation and Performing Arts-Folk, Tribal, Classical and Contemporary-all in one place.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfAccordingly, there will be a ‘ShilpHaat’ in which pavilions called “Aaangans” would be put up by each of the seven Zonal Cultural Centers (ZCCs) of the country as well as the Academies and IGNCA. In this ‘ShilpHaat’ master craftsmen from all over the country will display and sell their crafts to the general public and sale of the publications of these autonomous bodies on various aspects of Indian Culture is also a salient feature. Day-long performances of traditional performers of fringe-folk arts like ‘Behroopiyas’, ‘Baazigars’, ‘KacchiGhori’ etc will take place in the ShilpHaat and the rest of the campus. These artists are also known as ‘Maidaani Kalaakar’ as they perform in the open without any need for a stage. Facing the ShilpHaat will be a food court where masterchefs of traditional delicacies from different regions of the country will treat the visitors to an unparalleled culinary experience. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIn the lawns opposite the ‘MaatiGhar’ and in the Art Gallery of the IGNCA, two photo exhibitions will run concurrently. One of these exhibitions is on Vandalism of places of historical and national importance. This exhibition will be as a part of the ‘Swachh Bharat Abhiyan’. The second exhibition will be on the recently concluded ‘Simhastha Kumbh Mela’ showcasing its splendor and magnificence as well its importance in the cultural consciousness of the nation. Last, but not the least will be an opulent main stage in the open air stage area of the IGNCA campus where dance and singing performances by artists of National and International stature will take place. In order to connect the youth, a massive exercise in the online and social media sphere is being undertaken and a mobile app for Android based smart phones has been designed, which was launched by the Culture Minister in the Press Conference. The Minister also informed the media that 150 performances of 10 ‘Nukkad Naatak’ all over Delhi carrying important sociocultural messages dovetailing the message of RSM with the performances.last_img read more

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Jharkhand resident held for blackmailing extorting money from married woman

first_imgKolkata: The Bidhannagar Cyber Crime Police Station has arrested a person for allegedly extorting money from a woman by circulating her private pictures on the internet. He had also threatened her with dire consequences if she did not pay him the amount which he demanded.Police sources informed that on July 7, a woman from Kaikhali area lodged a complaint against Amit Kumar, a resident of Jharkhand, for allegedly extorting money by circulating her personal pictures on WhatsApp. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAfter police initiated a probe, it was revealed that the victim became acquainted with Kumar over phone, approximately a year ago. Later, she got involved with Kumar in a relationship, despite being married. The relationship lasted for six months and within that period, Kumar had come to Kolkata several times to meet her. During his visits, Kumar clicked some pictures of the victim, which he had kept with himself. Six months ago, the victim tried to end the relationship. But Kumar had other intentions. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedAfter the victim stated that she did not want to maintain any contact with Kumar, he allegedly started threatening her saying that he would circulate her personal pictures on the internet. Meanwhile, he opened a fake Facebook account using the victim’s name and picture and uploaded objectionable content and comments. Kumar even managed to get hold of the mobile number of the victim’s husband and sent some pictures to that mobile number as well. When the victim requested Kumar to stop his acts, he allegedly demanded money. A police team went to Dhanbad in Jharkhand and arrested Kumar. He was brought to Kolkata and produced before the Additional Chief Judicial Magistrate’s (ACJM) Court, Bidhannagar, pleading police remand. But due to work recess over a lawyer’s death, Kumar was remanded to judicial custody for one day instead, as there was no hearing on Tuesday. Kumar will be produced before the same court on Wednesday, with a plea for police custody.last_img read more

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20 footballers to undergo training under German club

first_imgDarjeeling: The Queen of the Hills is all set to reap the benefits of ‘Building Bridges’ programme of the iconic Eintracht Frankfurt Club of Germany.Scouting for young talents in India, a total of 20 footballers from the under 17 age bracket will be undergoing the football training of the club thus getting an international exposure. Representatives of the Eintracht Club were in Darjeeling to scout for young talents from the ‘Darjeeling Football Star — Pahari Footballer Ko Khoj’ a joint project of the Darjeeling Police in association with the Football Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeNext Foundation. “As the head coach of the Under-17 World Cup team of India till February 2017, I feel proud to be back. India has an immense talent. The under 17 team I coached was a very good team. Our task at hand now is to identify talent and develop them. I see no reason why an Indian footballer cannot make it to the top,” stated Nicolai Adam, Football Coach, Eintracht Frankfurt Club. Adam will be here for the next three days scouting for talents. Out of 3,000 young footballers, 150 have been shortlisted from Darjeeling Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedand Kalimpong. “We will choose the best 20 players who will be part of the Spring 2019 programme of Eintracht Frankfurt Club. We will provide the necessary infrastructure so that they get international exposure. Under the ‘Building Bridges’ programme of our club these boys will be trained,” stated Felix Hans Verel, representative of the club. Coaches from the club will be visiting Darjeeling to train the budding talents. “India is our target market. As under 17 is the golden age of learning we prefer this age. Now, we have a link with Darjeeling under our Building Bridges programme” added Verel. “This is our contribution to sustainable development of football,” stated Kaushik Moulik, Founder of Football Next Foundation. Recently, Manish Subba, a budding talent from Darjeeling had been sent to the Eintracht Frankfurt Club to get the feel of international football by Darjeeling Police and the Football Next Foundation along with 3 others from West Bengal.last_img read more

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