INFOGRAPHIC: Enterprise Mobility Trends

first_imgMobile computing has changed our world. With mobile devices in hand, we communicate differently, we interact differently, and we work differentlyOpens in a new window.What do employers consider to be the benefits of mobility in the workplace? This infographic points to the increase in worker productivity as the leading factor.For more information on enterprise mobility trends, check out the full infographic attached to this post!Did you know that when it comes to workplace mobility, users value location independence the most? Learn more in Intel’s study on Mobile Computing Trends!Join the conversation on Twitter by clicking on the hashtags below:#ITCenterOpens in a new window #EnterpriseMobilityOpens in a new windowlast_img

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Definitely Not Retirement, Says Varmus

first_imgHarold Varmus announced this morning that he’ll soon be leaving his job as president of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Later in the day, he spoke to Science and said the move shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone who’s been “reading the tea leaves.” From the start, he was clear that he’d keep the job for 10 years, and the end of that decade has come. “This is definitely not retirement,” he says. Here are some excerpts from the conversation, edited for brevity:Q: What are some of the highlights from your years heading up Sloan-Kettering?  What are you most proud of?H.V.: This is not a time for valedictories—I don’t want people to start summing it up and saying what we’ve done. When I’m actually leaving as president, then that might be a good time to sum it up. Thematically, what I’ve been trying to do is what everyone else is trying to do: bring the clinical and research enterprises together; recruiting great people; raising a lot of money that allows us to build new programs. We’ve [been] slowed down by the economic crunch. [But] we’ve hired a lot of great people—this place has been transformed as an institution that does cancer research across the board.Q: What’s the value of big cancer centers like Sloan-Kettering these days?Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)H.V.: There’s good reason to have places that have a strong research component and a very big patient-care responsibility, especially now. I’ve been in this business, I hate to say it, about 40 years. In the beginning, when I was working on chicken retroviruses, the connection between the clinic and what I did was zero. Now everything we do feels clinically relevant. I’ve tried to build our research across the board, but especially where basic research meets the patient.Q: Do you think cancer genomics, your research area, is moving slowly?H.V.: The institution was doing no genomics when I got here—now we have a computational biology program, an informatics core, at least three genome cores. These tests are improving the way we take care of cancer patients—I think it’s starting to happen.Q: What are you planning next?H.V.: I’m co-chair of PCAST [President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology], I’m the chair of the Public Library of Science, I chair an advisory committee for the Gates Foundation, and I have an active lab which I try to pay attention to. I’m a busy guy without the presidency. I’m perfectly happy [with what I’m doing]. But life is hard to predict. Nobody thinks I’m sick or old, so that’s good news. I’ve done this job long enough, and now someone else should do it.last_img read more

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‘Atlas of the Underworld’ reveals oceans and mountains lost to Earth’s history

first_img ‘Atlas of the Underworld’ reveals oceans and mountains lost to Earth’s history Models show slabs of ocean crust (yellow) falling to Earth’s core. If this was all nonsense, it is really quite a coincidence. By Paul VoosenNov. 22, 2016 , 9:00 AM Earth has a bad habit of erasing its own history. At intersections of tectonic plates worldwide, slabs of ocean crust dive into the mantle, part of the continuous cycle that not only drives the continents’ drift, but also fuels the volcanism that builds up island chains like Japan and mountains like the Andes. The disappearance of these slabs, called subduction, makes it difficult to reconstruct oceans as they existed hundreds of millions of years ago, as well as the mountains flanking them. “Every day, we’re losing geologic information from the face of the Earth,” says Jonny Wu, a geologist at the University of Houston in Texas. “It’s like losing pieces of broken glass as you’re trying to put it together again.”But geoscientists have begun to pick up these pieces by peering into the mantle itself, using earthquake waves that pass through Earth’s interior to generate images resembling computerized tomography (CT) scans. In the past few years, improvements in these tomographic techniques have revealed many of these cold, thick slabs as they free fall in slow motion to their ultimate graveyard—heaps of rock sitting just above Earth’s molten core, 2900 kilometers below.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Now, the complete x-ray of Earth’s interior is coming into focus. Next month, at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, California, a team of Dutch scientists will announce a catalog of 100 subducted plates, with information about their age, size, and related surface rock records, based on their own tomographic model and cross-checks with other published studies. “Step by step we went deeper and deeper, older and older,” says Douwe van Hinsbergen, a geologist at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, who led the project along with Utrecht geologists Douwe van der Meer and Wim Spakman. Fabio Crameri Douwe van Hinsbergen, geologist, Utrecht University (Map) J. You/Science; (Data) Van Hinsbergen/Van Der Meer/Spakman/Utrecht University This “atlas of the underworld,” as they call it, holds the ghosts of past geography. By rewinding the clock and bringing these cataloged slabs back to the surface, scientists can figure out the sizes and locations of ancient oceans. Moreover, they can locate where the sinking slabs would have triggered melting, releasing blobs of magma that rose into the crust and drove volcanism. That has helped earth scientists pinpoint where ancient mountains rose and later eroded away, their traces visible only in unexplained rock records. “It’s a pretty exciting time to be able to pull all of these pieces together,” says Mathew Domeier, a tectonic modeler at the University of Oslo. That has only recently become possible, as the underlying technique, mantle tomography, is plagued with uncertainties. It relies on millions of seismic waves received by sensors scattered unevenly around the world. Waves with faster arrival times are assumed to have passed through the colder rock of subducted slabs. But seismometer coverage is patchy; earthquakes—the sources of the seismic waves—don’t occur everywhere; and the waves get fuzzier as they pass near the core or travel long distances. “Very often for regions that have the most interesting structures, you have the most uncertainty,” says Ved Lekic, a tomographer at the University of Maryland in College Park. Academic groups around the world use more than 20 models to interpret tomographic data, and their pictures of the mantle and its structures often conflict, says Grace Shephard, a postdoc at the University of Oslo. In the coming months, she will publish a comparison of 14 different models that will assess which slabs seem most likely to be real. Her results could cast doubt on some of the slabs in the Utrecht atlas. But the image of Earth’s interior is becoming more believable, thanks to improved computing power and such intercomparison projects.By now the picture of lost plates is precise enough for scientists to try rewinding the clock, reconstructing vanished worlds. In earlier tomography, the plunging slabs looked like blobs in a lava lamp. But as the models have improved, the slabs in the upper mantle have been revealed to be stiff, straight curtains, says John Suppe, who heads the Center for Tectonics and Tomography at the University of Houston. The images make it clear that as they plunge, the 500-kilometer-thick slabs flex but don’t crumple—and that has made it easier for Suppe and others to unwind them. “We’re finding these plates unfold fairly easily, and they’re not that deformed,” Suppe says. Atlas of the underworld A catalog of 100 slabs buried in Earth’s mantle shows their size, age, and former positions near the surface. These slab-driven reconstructions are calling into question plate movements inferred from ancient oceanic crust that was scraped off and preserved on the continents, Suppe says. “Almost everywhere we’ve looked at this,” Suppe says, “what we find in the mantle isn’t exactly what would be predicted.”The reconstructions are also resurrecting mountains that had been lost to time. For example, in a study published several months ago, Wu and Suppe reconstructed the travels of 28 slabs to recreate the Philippine Sea as it was more than 50 million years ago. Beyond identifying what appears to be a previously unknown piece of ocean crust, they predicted that as one of their paleoplates plunged into the mantle, it threw up a large chain of volcanoes that eventually collided with Asia. That convulsive process could explain mysterious folded rocks in Japan and beneath the East China Sea.Similarly, slabs beneath North America have helped bring that continent’s history of mountain building into clearer focus. By rewinding the clock for some of them, Karin Sigloch, a geophysicist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, showed that North America’s western mountain chains, including the Rockies, likely formed between 200 million and 50 million years ago when several small plates were subducted beneath the continent, plastering multiple volcanic archipelagos against the landmass. Van Hinsbergen and his Utrecht peers hope their comprehensive atlas of slabs will make it possible to reconstruct a fuller picture of ancient geography. In 2012, they used slab tomography to constrain the longitude of volcanic island arcs that 200 million years ago dotted the ocean surrounding the Pangea supercontinent. Two years later they used their global model to estimate the number of subduction zones that would have been active over the past 250 million years, along with the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that subduction-related volcanoes would have emitted. The estimate closely matched geologic proxy records for atmospheric CO2 over the same period. And earlier this year, Van Hinsbergen published a study in Science Advances with Lydian Boschman, a graduate student, that identified several slabs that may have played a role in the birth of the Pacific Ocean. “We have done it,” Van Hinsbergen says. “If this was all nonsense, it is really quite a coincidence.”Even with these new techniques, which Suppe together calls “slab tectonics,” the mantle’s memory of ocean slabs only stretches back 250 million years—the time it takes for one to fall to the bottom of the mantle and be fully recycled. Beyond that, Earth continues to cover its tracks.last_img read more

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WATCH: Shahid Afridi’s respectful gesture towards Indian flag in Switzerland wins hearts

first_imgShahid Afridi won hearts around the globe for his gesture at the Ice Cricket Challenge.Afridi’s Royals won both the matches against Virender Sehwag’s Palace Diamonds and the Pakistan star then posed for pictures with some fans, who had turned up in large numbers to watch their favourite players in action.WATCHAfridi asked an Indian fan to “Yeh flag seedha karo na apna.” (Hold your flag upright.)This gesture from Afridi was appreciated by Indian as well as Pakistani fans.Shahid Afridi’s message to all the pseudo nationalists. pic.twitter.com/N5zbJS4UciSiona Gogoi (@AtomicBlow) February 10, 2018@SAfridiOfficial Pure GemThats Why I Really Love YouGreat Player & A Great Human BeingThankyou #ShahidAfridi For Showing Immense Respect Towards Our FlagMost Loved Pak Cricketer In India!Fan For Life!#Dhoni #Kohli #Afridi Spreading Love Between #India & Pak pic.twitter.com/zbCnaE2LCTPadman 1st Day 20cr (@iamtnvr) February 10, 2018Shahid Afridi wants Indian flag to be open while clicking a photo with fans in switzerland. pic.twitter.com/vq88m8htpBNibraz Ramzan (@Nibrazcricket) February 9, 2018Modern greats faced off for two T20 matches in the resort town of St Moritz in sub-zero temperatures. The matches were played on a frozen, snow-covered lake. An artificial turf carpet was placed in the center to use as a pitch.The two teams were captained by Sehwag and Afridi. And the participants included Mahela Jayawardene, Mike Hussey, Zaheer Khan, Lasith Malinga, Graeme Smith, Jacques Kallis, Shoaib Akthar among others.advertisementOn the sidelines of the Ice Cricket 2018 in Switzerland, Afridi told Sports Tak that Kohli is among the best cricketers in the world.”Virat is one the best in the world at the moment. I am highly impressed with his style of play and his aggressive attitude on the field. He always supports my foundation by giving away his shirt or bat,” Shahid Afidi told Sports Tak.Afridi further praised the Indian team’s efforts in South Africa in the ongoing one day international series. India have taken a 3-0 unbeatable lead after victories in the first three ODIs.”It’s a great effort by the Indian team. We have seen India struggling overseas in the past but they have been playing wonderful cricket in the series. No doubt, Kohli always leads his team to victory when he performs,” he added.last_img read more

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a day agoTxiki: Man City fancied Arsenal keeper Leno

first_imgTxiki: Man City fancied Arsenal keeper Lenoby Paul Vegasa day agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City were keen on signing Arsenal goalkeeper Bernd Leno from Bayer Leverkusen before landing Ederson.Pep Guardiola had both goalkeepers watched extensively during his first season in charge upon realising Claudio Bravo’s move from Barcelona wasn’t going to work out.A new book charting Guardiola’s unprecedented success, ‘Pep’s City: The making of a superteam,’ reveals the two-man shortlist to replace Bravo in 2017.”They both fitted the bill,” sporting director Txiki Begiristain said. “One was more expensive to buy, the other required a higher salary. “I left it up to the coaches to choose.”Chief executive Ferran Soriano added: “(Ederson is) cheap at the price.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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New ScrubberFitted Tanker Delivered to Navig8

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license UK-based shipping company Navig8 Group has set up Navig8 Product 2020, a new platform dedicated to scrubber-fitted tankers.The new company, which focuses on the transportation of CPP, will operate eight LR2 tankers to be fitted with scrubbers.The first of these units, named Navig8 Pride LHJ, was handed over from Chinese shipbuilder New Times Shipbuilding to the company on August 4.The 110,600 dwt newbuilding features a capacity of 126,249 cbm.Navig8 Pride LHJ will be entered into and operated in Navig8 Group’s Alpha8 commercial pool.According to data provided by VesselsValue, the company will take delivery of three more units from the batch by the end of 2018, while the remaining four would join the company’s fleet in 2019. All of these ships are set to join the Alpha8 pool.last_img read more

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Wilhelmsen Reports FullYear Loss 2019 Outlook Steady

first_imgzoomThomas Wilhelmsen, Group CEO; Image Courtesy: Wilhelmsen Norwegian maritime industry group Wilhelmsen ended 2018 — the first full year with present corporate structure — in loss.In the preliminary result for the year, the group reported a loss for the period of USD 75 million in 2018, compared to a loss of USD 2 million posted a year earlier.The reporting period was followed by the full consolidation of NorSea Group in the new supply services segment, reclassification of Wilh. Wilhelmsen ASA prior to the Wallenius Wilhelmsen ASA merger as a discontinued operation, and reclassification of Hyundai Glovis as a financial investment.Group EBITDA came in at USD 78 million for the year, down 60% from USD 198 million in 2017. EBITDA was up mainly due to full-year consolidation of NorSea Group.Maritime services EBITDA was USD 42 million in 2018. When adjusting for M&A expenses related to the abandoned Drew acquisition, EBITDA was up 6% for the year. A weak first quarter was followed by a gradual improvement in underlying performance. This was supported by the increased sale of marine products, new vessels on management, and positive effects from ongoing improvement initiatives, as explained by Wilhelmsen.What is more, the new supply services segment contributed with EBITDA of USD 51 million for the year. An increase in Norwegian offshore activities and a business restructuring had a positive effect on results, as well as logistics services for the NATO exercise Trident Juncture which took place during the second half of the year.The holding and investments segment had a negative EBITDA of USD 14 million, mainly related to net corporate cost.Additionally, Wilhelmsen recorded USD 36 million in share of profit from associates, of which Wallenius Wilhelmsen ASA contributed with USD 23 million. For Wallenius Wilhelmsen ASA, realised synergies and a positive development in underlying volumes were offset by reduced contractual volumes, higher bunker cost and lower rates.The company suffered USD 116 million loss on financial assets, following a USD 61 million impairment of the Survitec investment and a USD 53 million reduction in the market value of the investment in Hyundai Glovis.Quarterly performanceEBITDA ended at USD 29 million in the fourth quarter of 2018, down 12% from the previous quarter. A positive development in the maritime service segment was not enough to make up for reduced EBITDA in the supply service segment.“The underlying performance was stable in a continued challenging market,” Thomas Wilhelmsen, group CEO, said.“With activity levels on par with the previous quarter in ship service and ship management, the seasonally lower activity level in the offshore sector was offset by delivering logistics services to the NATO exercise Trident Juncture.”“The value of our investments took a beating in the quarter, leaving us with a net loss of USD 40 million.”“The beginning of 2019 has so far shown an uplift in valuation of listed entities,” he added.OutlookAccording to Wilhelmsen, market prospects for 2019 call for a steady, cautious outlook.The group’s CEO said that the year will be characterized by initiatives aimed at strengthening profitability in all of its companies.Based on the market outlook, the board expects a stable development of underlying operating performance, but with normal seasonal variations.Wilhelmsen’s exposure towards global trade and potential introduction of further tariffs and restrictions continues to create uncertainties, according to the group.“Wilhelmsen retains its robustness to meet such eventualities,” the group concluded.last_img read more

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Why Ventimiglia is carrying a nuclear football

first_imgLos Angeles: Actor Milo Ventimiglia has an idea about how his popular show ‘This Is Us’ will end, and he says keeping the secret is like a “carrying a nuclear football”. “I know the far-off (on how ‘This Is Us’ will end), but that’s also what I’ve been told. So, things can always change. It’s a newspaper. You got to wait and see what’s going to happen. But what I do know? I mean it is really, truly beautiful,” Ventimiglia said. Does he like carrying the burden of knowing the end about the show, but not being able to reveal it? Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: Priyanka”No. Who does? It’s like carrying a nuclear football. It’s like this is the thing that destroys the world,” said the actor during his appearance on ‘Late Night With Seth Meyers’. ‘This Is Us’, also featuring Mandy Moore, Justin Hartley, Sterling K Brown and Chrissy Metz, revolves around the lives of a group of people with the same birthday, including Jack (Ventimiglia), whose wife, Rebecca (Moore), is expecting triplets in Pittsburgh. The show is also making headlines for incorporating complex emotions in the storyline, and throwing light on issues like male stereotyping in showbiz. Some people want to know how it all ends, but many others would be furious if he gave out spoilers by revealing the end. What does he plan to do? “I’m just going to shut my mouth now and not say a word. Actually, I don’t know anything. I’m just going to play a stupid actor,” he said on a lighter note.last_img read more

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Renault Group Collaborates with Customs Administration and Indirect Taxes

Rabat – The Administration of Customs and Indirect Taxes (ADII) signed an agreement with Renault Group on Monday in Rabat, sealing their partnership and granting the label “Authorized Economic Operators (AEO) of Safety and Security” to Renault’s plant in Tangier. The two parties also signed a memorandum of understanding to fight counterfeiting.This agreement guarantees Customs of the reliability of the company, which is certified in terms of safety and security at the supply chain level. It will also allow Renault Group to benefit from a personalized range of customs facilities that simplify of customs formalities and reduce customs clearance costs.  The main aim of the counterfeiting agreement is to strengthen the trademarks owned by the French automobile company and to bolster counterfeit border measures. The agreement also aims to increase collaboration between the two partners in order to combat more effectively counterfeiting and its negative repercussions on the national economy and company competitiveness. Read Also: Renault Achieved 65 percent of Moroccan Ecosystem Expansion Goals in 2017By signing this memorandum, the Renault Group in Morocco is committed to strengthen bilateral cooperation and share its expertise in the field of the automotive with the ADII through the implementation of in-depth training courses on Renault and Dacia products, which will be at the disposal of the Moroccan Customs officers in all of the country’s ports. read more

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Joint opposition protests disrupting House proceedings

“I am told never in history had there been a brawl in Sri Lanka’s Chamber like the one just now. I saw Gamini Lokuge start. Disgraceful,” he said.He said there were also reports that someone threw an object at the Prime Minister when he was speaking. The situation got tensed resulting in some Parliamentarians being assaulted. The joint opposition staged a protest in Parliament today disrupting the proceedings of the House.The protest was staged when Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe was speaking in Parliament when Parliament met to debate the report on the treasury bond scam. The protest was over the failure to table the treasury bond scam report in Parliament today.A party leaders meeting was convened and Parliament later commenced sittings again.During the proceedings the opposition accused the Speaker of failing to ensure the report was tabled in Parliament today. (Colombo Gazette) Deputy Minister Dr. Harsha de Silva said that there was pandemonium in Parliament during the protest. read more

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UN human rights experts urge Egypt to release jailed poet who penned

The song ‘Balaha’, performed by Ramy Essam, went online on 26 February, with the music video quickly going viral and drawing over 3.7 million social media views. Just five days later, Mr. El Behairy was arrested by National Security Police and detained for a week at an undisclosed location, before being charged with affiliating with terrorists, “disseminating false news, abusing social-media networks, blasphemy, contempt of religion and insulting the military” according to a statement released by six rights experts.At the time of that first court appearance he showed signs of torture and beating. His first trial in Military Court began on 6 May, and after being delayed three times, sentencing is due to take place this coming Saturday. He remains in Tora Prison, in the capital Cairo.  “We are very worried at the reported criminalisation of the legitimate exercise of artistic expression through the imposition of a range of dubious charges,” said the experts.“We are alarmed at the arrest and alleged ill-treatment of Mr. El Behairy which appears to be related solely to the peaceful exercise of his right to freedom of artistic expression and creativity,” they added.We have received allegations that it is increasingly common for artists, activists and journalists to be arrested and detained on charges, such as ‘publishing false news’ – UN rights expertsThe poet’s detention takes place against a backdrop of restrictions to artistic and other forms of expression as well as to the right to participate in the country’s cultural life.“We have received allegations that it is increasingly common for artists, activists and journalists to be arrested and detained on charges, such as ‘publishing false news’,” said the experts.In a separate case on similar charges, still under investigation by the High State-Security, Mr. El Behairy can be further detained for up to two years without trial.“We urge the relevant authorities to investigate the alleged ill-treatment of Mr. El Behairy, and to acquit him of all charges related to the creative expression of his political views,” stated the rights experts.“We recall that all individuals have the right to participate in varied information exchanges, to contribute to artistic expression, and to take part in cultural life and in the development of their society, including through political debate and expression of opinion and dissent, without fear of sanction or reprisals,” they concluded.The rights experts are Karima Bennoune, Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights; David Kaye, Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression; Ahmed Shaheed, Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief; Seong Phil Hong, Chair-Rapporteur of the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention; Nils Melzer, Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; and Bernard Duhaime, Chair-Rapporteur of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances. read more

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Strawberries and child support a Thai partnership

But that changed following the birth of her third child, Monluck, and the introduction of a nationwide child support grant worth just under US$20 per month. “I was so happy when I heard this news,” Mhee says. “Before, I didn’t have money to take my children to see doctors.” The grant, for which 117,000 children from low-income families have been registered, was introduced by the Thai government following advocacy carried out by the UN Children’s Fund, UNICEF. Read more here about how vulnerable families in Thailand are benefitting from child support payments.The ‘core’ of the Sustainable Development GoalsIt is an example of the type of partnerships that United Nations agencies are building with governments as part of a global push to realize the 17 sustainable development goals of the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which aims to eradicate poverty, and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity while protecting the planet.“Partnerships are at the core of the sustainable development goals,” said Deidre Boyd, the United Nations Resident Coordinator in Thailand, the UN’s most senior official in the country. “The goals are so ambitious, that it is clear everyone has to be involved.”In Thailand, an upper middle-income country which “has dealt with many of the major issues of poverty and access to health services,” Ms Boyd said, “our role as the UN is to really strengthen the partnerships with people and organizations in Thailand to achieve the SDGs.” Sustainable development goal 17 seeks to strengthen global partnerships to support and achieve the ambitious targets of the 2030 Agenda, bringing together national governments, the international community, civil society, the private sector and other actors. The UN believes, “we are all in this together”, and that “change begins with you”, and encourages individuals to get involved in the SDGs generally by making small changes to their lifestyles, for example turning off lights to save electricity. On a partnerships level it suggests engaging, or partnering, with local and national authorities to participate in initiatives that don’t harm people or the planet.And the UN suggests mentoring young people at work, adding that “it’s a thoughtful, inspiring and a powerful way to guide someone towards a better future.” The UN has even produced a guide showing how “lazy people” can get involved.,Aren’t partnerships already happening?Yes, the United Nations has always worked in partnership with national governments, development partners, civil society, and the corporate world, as well as individuals, and SDG 17 is all about strengthening those partnerships and making sure they are more productive in terms of reaching the ambitious targets set out in the 16 other goals.,What is SDG 17? It means a lot of work going on behind the scenes, which, while not necessarily headline-grabbing, could have a profound effect on positive progress towards the goals. For example, measures to improve the capacity of national governments for tax and other revenue collection means those governments should have more money to spend on providing basic services like health and education. Partnerships to boost communications technology should result in more people in developing countries getting access to the internet. And working to “significantly increase the exports of developing countries, in particular with a view to doubling the least developed countries’ share of global exports by 2020”, as the goal explains, should bring more prosperity to some of the world’s poorest countries. “The sharing of expertise and knowledge, including data, is also highlighted in SDG 17. In June 2019, the United Nations specialized agency for information and communication technologies, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), launched a partnership to collect and provide data on electronic waste (for example, discarded television sets, mobile phones and computers and end-of-life batteries) which it describes as “the fastest growing part of the world’s domestic waste stream.” The idea is to use the data to help track progress towards global e-waste legislation and recycling goals. How does this impact individuals? 5 things you need to know about Partnerships for the Sustainable Development GoalsWhat are they, and why are they needed?In 2015, world leaders adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that aims to end poverty, tackle inequalities and combat climate change. Governments, civil society, scientists, academia and the private sector need to come together to achieve the sustainable development goals and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 17 looks at how best that can be achieved.While most of the goals focus on specific sectors, for example, health, hunger, decent work, climate and many more, SDG 17 reflects a holistic approach to implementing for the 2030 Agenda. It cuts across all the other goals and includes 19 targets that span finance, technology, capacity-building, trade and systemic issues, which focus on policy and institutional coherence.That sounds ambitious?It is, and the UN has said that the world should be doing better. “Despite some advances in certain areas in 2017, more needs to be done to accelerate progress. All stakeholders will have to intensify and focus their efforts on the areas where progress has been slow,” the UN Secretary-General António Guterres wrote in a recent reportThe UN has also emphasized that countries should focus on partnership efforts that support the SDGs and which help to fill existing gaps in SDG implementation, be it ensuring that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education, or that all forms of discrimination against all women and girls are ended.So, what does this mean in practice? read more

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November 2012 – EV and AFV registrations

SMMT has published Electric and Alternatively-Fuelled Vehicle registration figures for November and the year-to-date.Plug-In Car Grant: Since the launch of the Plug-In Car Grant in January 2011, there have been 2,666 eligible cars registered.Please note: this data includes only new car registrations and not commercial vehicles.For questions about these figures, or to enquire about more detailed data sets, e-mail data@smmt.co.uk.For more information about the Plug-In Car Grant, visit the OLEV website. Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)

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Canadian scientist names beetle after Jose Bautista

OTTAWA — Jose Bautista has a new namesake buzzing around.Entomologist Bob Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature has dubbed a newly discovered species of beetle Sicoderus bautistai after the former Toronto Blue Jays star.Anderson decided to name the insect — known as a weevil for its long snout — after Bautista because of the bat-flip home run that propelled Toronto to the 2015 American League Championship Series.“It was one of those moments in Toronto baseball sort of lore where he hit this big home run,” Anderson said Thursday. “And I thought what a great way to kind of recognize his contributions to Blue Jay baseball and to Canadian baseball, really, as a whole.”The 38-year-old Bautista played for Toronto from 2009 to 2017. He’s a free agent after splitting last season with the New York Mets, Atlanta Braves and Philadelphia Phillies.The Sicoderus bautistai is a tiny black weevil that is found in Bautista’s native Dominican Republic.Anderson has named about 120 weevils over his career.“One of the nice things about this is that you have some latitude to do something kind of quirky,” Anderson said. “(Naming) sort of builds on a history and the names tell little stories.”___More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/tag/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_SportsThe Associated Press read more

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Britains cushiest jail The superprison where inmates are men not offenders

first_imgBritain’s biggest jail where prisoners will be called “men” rather than “offenders” and the governor insists that the rooms are not cells has started welcoming inmates. Criminals arriving at HMP Berwyn will find a laptop, TV and phone in their en-suite rooms and be able to make use of the all-weather football pitch and gyms when they are not in classes. Prison officers will have to knock before entering the rooms, which will not be referred to as cells, and the men will not be referred to as offenders or ex-offenders, to try to prevent them living up to the label. Governor Russ Trent has said that he wants it to be “truly rehabilitative” but critics have questioned whether the facility is too soft.  A cell at HMP Berwyn complete with a TV and phone  He said: “The opportunity we have got at Berwyn is we have got staff that understand the principles of rehabilitation and the desire to give men in custody the hope that they can have a better life in the future. ” The facility also has a full-sized 3G football pitch, gyms, an education block, workshops, sports hall, multi-use games areas, a health and wellbeing centre, and multi-faith centre. Inspirational posters adorn the walls with messages including  “Look to the future with ambition and hope” and “Big journeys begin with little steps”. There will even be a scout group at the prison for the children of those behind bars. Mr Trent said that the men are punished when they are taken away from their homes and families, so whilst in prison they should have decent conditions and live a life as normal as possible. It is the first in a series of new “super-prisons” to open  its doors and was last month heralded by Liz Truss, the Justice Secretary, as proof that the system is being modernised.  HMP Berwyn gymCredit:Daily Post Wales HMP Berwyn cell where prisoners have access to a phone, computer and TV in their room  But Philip Davies MP, who sits on the Justice Committee, warned that for their to be trust in the system the public needed to see justice being done. He said that the perks they had sent a “terrible message”, adding: “You can rehabilitate people without giving them the creature comforts that many of my constituents could not afford such as a computer in their room.” The prison is run in a collegiate system, like Oxford and Cambridge universities, and is split into three blocks of 700 so the men have more of a sense of belonging.  At the moment, only one block is operational. The blocks are broken up into 24 communities, which can hold up to 88 people. There are even specific communities for armed forces veterans. Staff say the smaller communities make the men easier to manage and will help foster a better atmosphere. The other blocks are scheduled to open in May and late July.    HMP Berwyn cell where prisoners have access to a phone, computer and TV in their room Credit:Daily Post Wales/Cascade Any suggestion that it will be “cushy” has been rejected by Nick Dann, the deputy project director.  “They are not prisoners, they are men. If you keep calling someone an offender or ex-offender, that’s how they will act,” he said. “If they start off with the mindset that this does not feel like a prison, we are hoping they will act like it is not a prison as well. “When Nelson Mandela was in custody, he wrote about the importance of normality. The more normal you make it on the inside, the easier it is to transition when they get out.” Costing £250m to buid,  the Category C prison can hold up to 2,100 inmates, making the biggest in the UK and one of the biggest prisons in Europe. A cell at HMP Berwyn complete with a TV and phone Credit:North Wales Daily Post HMP Berwyn communal areaCredit:Daily Post Wales  HMP Berwyn communal area Mr Trent, a former Royal Marine who was seen as a trouble shooter, has said that the facility will be run on ‘Mandela Rules’,  a United Nations standard aimed at making life in prison as similar as possible to life on the outside. Therefore the inmates, who started arriving on Tuesday, will find their rooms kitted out with technology to make their lives as “normal” as possible. Laptops will not have access to the internet but will be used by the men to arrange visits, order meals for the week and do their weekly shopping, as well as complete any work related to their studies.They will have phones in their rooms which can call approved numbers “so they can ring their children at night and say goodnight”.  He had previously told staff he didn’t call the men in custody prisoners or offenders and claimed that by describing their living areas as rooms not cells it was “giving them ownership of it and how they live in there and how they keep it clean and tidy”. Michael Gove, then Justice Secretary, said that his approach was “absolutely right” as “the principal purpose of prison is rehabilitation”.  HMP Berwyn gym Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Mine automation expenditure set to grow according to ARC Advisory Group

first_imgThe growth trend in the mining and metals industry that spurred demand for automation, instrumentation, and operational software came to a halt in the last quarter of 2008, according to ARC Advisory Group. The cause was the now well-known global financial crisis. However, spending will still be needed in 2009 with stronger spending to begin in 2010 and beyond, according to Analyst Dick Hill (dhill@arcweb.com), the principal author of ARC’s Automation Expenditures in Mining and Metals Worldwide Outlook.Through the first few months of 2008, demand for metals worldwide continued to grow. Emerging market demand was growing fastest as manufacturers in Asia and Eastern Europe increased production of industrial and consumer goods. Now the situation is quite different. World demand for steel in the first quarter of 2009 has dropped by nearly 25%, causing major steel producers to see profits plummet. The reduced demand for iron and steel has led to a dramatic drop in both the demand and price for iron ore. Through 2007, suffice it to say that no one saw the downturn coming, in terms of investment spending in mining and metals. With the global economic downturn as a backdrop, it is understandable that mining and metals companies have cut back the aggressive growth plans of pre-2008. The leading global mining and metals companies understand that, though it may seem counterintuitive in light of the current economic downturn, it’s important not to under-invest even now. Certainly, capital outlays are required to maintain production levels at existing mining sites as well as metals processing facilities. The larger investments seen prior to the current down turn have been postponed, but will have to be made to keep up with global demand for minerals and metals.Over the long term, demand will rise again, particularly in developing regions, and mining and metals prices will rise along with it. Indeed, over the short term, engineering and materials costs may go down as some more complex projects are put on hold, and steep drops in demand for finished goods helps to push down the prices for steel and other commodities. The end result is a more favourable environment for investment than many might expect.Regionally, the highest growth rates will occur in Asia and Latin America. Asia’s share of sales will reach 35%, according to the report, and while the highest growth in expenditures will be in Latin America over the forecast period, the region will still remain a relatively small portion of the overall market. Despite the strong growth in developing regions, Europe Middle East and Africa will have the largest share of the market. North America’s demand for automation, instrumentation, and software solutions will be nearly a quarter of the world’s sales, but growth is expected to be the lowest of all four world regions.The report examines the market for automation systems, instrumentation, and operational software in the mining of minerals through the production of metals. It provides strategic market information and guidance. In addition to quantitative assessments, the study also identifies key strategic issues that will have a future impact on this market:Market potential and size for automation systems and field devicesLeading suppliers in this vertical industry sectorMarket size in various world regionsStrategies for suppliers and manufacturers in the worldwide mining and metals industry to maximize opportunities in a dynamic energy market.Worldwide Study Table of ContentsExecutive SummaryScopeMarket size and forecastStrategies and recommendations for success.ScopeMarket Shares List of FiguresMarket shares of the leading suppliersMarket shares by regiono North Americao Europe, Middle East, Africao Asiao Latin America.Market Forecast List of FiguresTotal shipments of automation solutions to the Mining and Metals IndustryShipments by regiono North Americao Europe, Middle East, Africao Asiao Latin AmericaShipments by product typeo Collaborative production managemento Control valveso DCS without SCADAo Enterprise asset managemento Flowmeterso High power AC drives without midrangeo Human machine interface softwareo Laboratory information management systemso Low power AC driveso Plant asset managemento Process electrochemical systemso Process engineering toolso Programmable logic controllerso Real-time process optimisationo TransmittersSupplier ProfilesProfiles for 11 of the major suppliers servicing this market are included.  Each profile reviews the company’s business, products, and services as it applies to this market segment.  Suppliers profiled include ABB, Converteam, Danfoss, Emerson Process Management, Hitachi, Honeywell, Invensys Process Systems, Rockwell Automation, Siemens, Toshiba Mitsubishi-Electric Industrial Systems (TMEIC), YokogawaFor more information on this study, go to www.arcweb.com/res/metalslast_img read more

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CEEC medal launched to recognise outstanding advancement in comminution

first_imgElizabeth Lewis-Gray, Chairman and Managing Director of Gekko Systems and Chairman of the CEEC (Coalition for Eco-Efficient Comminution), announced in an October 2011 statement the launch of an inaugural CEEC medal. This is an annual award intended to recognise and celebrate the contribution of outstanding published papers, articles or case studies profiling beneficial strategies for eco-efficient comminution. “The CEEC Medal is intended to bring attention to ‘best-in-class’ research or documentation in the field of eco- efficient comminution. This area of mineral processing provides significant opportunities for improved profit and energy savings in the mining industry”, Ms Lewis-Gray said.The activities of the CEEC are described in some detail in International Mining’s article on comminution in the November issue.The CEEC believes that the new award will contribute to raising the status of beneficial eco-efficient comminution strategies by recognising and celebrating individuals or teams who make an outstanding contribution in the field of beneficial eco-efficient comminution strategies. It will also act to acknowledge individuals or teams who contribute to building global knowledge of beneficial eco-efficient comminution practices by sharing examples of best practice and leadership in eco-efficient comminution and inspiring similar excellence in others. Finally, it will Identify those who build greater awareness and understanding in the wider community of the benefits of knowledge transfer in the area of eco-efficient comminution and energy savings.The first CEEC medal recipient will be announced in June 2012 and the winner(s) will receive international acknowledgement. As a global award, the winning author/authors will be recognised in their home country at an appropriate ceremony. For those interested in nominating potential winners, papers and articles submitted for consideration for the CEEC award need to be innovative; of a standard suitable for technical review, written or published within the past 12 months; ideally demonstrate on-site pilot studies, and display “breadth and depth of publication of results and findings within the mining sector and research field.” Application information for the CEEC Medal can be found on CEEC’s web site www.ceecthefuture.org. Applications will be received up to March 15, 2012. Further details can be found on CEEC’s web or by contacting CEEC’s Executive Officer via email: Sarah.boucaut@ceecthefuture.orglast_img read more

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Dont avoid risk manage it better – SRK says of Africa

first_imgWith Africa still low on the global mining risk rankings, explorers and developers being drawn back into the continent by the commodity price recovery would be wise to step carefully – on the strength of quality studies and plans informed by experienced local professionals.According to the latest World Risk Report from Mining Journal, “Africa narrowly avoided the wooden spoon as the riskiest major region.” The continent’s average score was 48 – compared with the leading scores of 80 for Canada and 74 for the USA; Asia was one point behind Africa, on 47. Morocco was the only African jurisdiction to reach 60 points on the scale.SRK Consulting partner and principal consultant Andrew van Zyl said in addition to the myriad technical risks associated with mining, there are related issues to consider such as famine, water shortages, population growth, agricultural production and climate change.“There are even risks emerging from the influence of social media that are capable of affecting a mining company’s reputation among a wider group of stakeholders and the public,” said Van Zyl. “These broader risks can threaten a mine’s social licence to operate – even though they are not really within the power of the company to solve on its own.”He highlighted, however, that low-risk destinations for mining were not necessarily the places that would deliver the best return on investment – especially since most of the world’s more developed regions were also well explored.“Many African countries remain highly prospective due to low levels of past exploration, which is what continues to draw the attention of explorers and mining investors,” he said. “The idea is not to avoid the risks that these countries present, but to identify them fully and manage them well.”The authors of the World Risk Report would agree, reminding readers that “a low-risk environment for mining does not make it a good place to invest” – while adding that they would not consider any jurisdiction “uninvestable”. Rather, they said, “some places just require better risk management skills.”Among the universal challenges facing African mines is productivity and competitiveness, said Marcin Wertz, SRK partner and principal mining engineer.“Fast moving trends in mechanisation and automation are driving productivity and will doubtless lead to fewer people on mines, but will also require new skill-sets in which traditional engineering disciplines will be augmented by computer-related skills,” said Wertz. “More onerous regulations will also mean that mine managers spend more of their time on compliance and stakeholder-related issues.”Potential for community-related conflict is one of the areas receiving closer attention as the impacts of climate change start being felt in various parts of Africa, said Van Zyl.“Senegal and Niger, for instance, have experienced temperature increases that affect food security and fuel the process of desertification ,” he said. “There are more famines than ever before, and we are seeing more instability related to acts of terror; high migration levels also reflect the extent of disruption among communities in many parts of Africa.”These factors will impact on all economic sectors including mining – often because mines are ‘islands of wealth’ in environments characterised by poverty.“Starting and running a successful exploration or mining project in Africa means working with partners who combine local knowledge with a depth of specialised technical expertise – from the management team to the advisors,” he said. “Their skills and insights must take the operation beyond compliance and into a longer-term model of sustainability built on solid stakeholder engagement and shared value.”Applying this philosophy to all stages of the mining cycle, SRK is now strengthening its exploration offering with the launch at the 2018 African Mining Indaba of SRK Exploration Services in southern Africa.last_img read more

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Control Your Parrot ARDrone with a Surface Table from Microsoft

first_imgAdChoices广告 Most people have seen the Parrot AR.Drone at this point. It made a splash at ces earlier this month, and was the star of the show last year; the little iPhone-controlled quad-copter is a combination toy and reconnaissance drone is perfect for fun neighborhood spy missions. However, what if you could control your Parrot AR.Drone with a Microsoft Surface table? These French researchers from Winwise have created an app that uses the same commands as the AR.Drone’s iOS app, just laid out on a Microsoft Surface table that you sit in front of to control. They claim the idea came to them when they were thinking of a way to build a cockpit for the drone, and that the Microsoft Surface was a great way to blow up the image from the drone’s camera. The controls work well enough, but considering the drone retails for $299.99 and Microsoft’s Surface systems are “ask if you want one” when it comes to price, it’s unlikely we’ll start seeing them show up in living rooms anytime soon.last_img read more

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EtatsUnis lOréal veut aider à développer une alternative aux tests sur les

first_imgEtats-Unis : l’Oréal veut aider à développer une alternative aux tests sur les animauxLe géant français des cosmétiques L’Oréal a annoncé avoir versé 1,2 million de dollars à l’Agence américaine de protection de l’environnement (EPA) qui développe actuellement une alternative aux tests cliniques sur les animaux.Alors que les militants continuent de critiquer les laboratoires qui pratiquent encore des tests sur les animaux, une nouvelle alternative à ces essais cliniques pourraient prochainement voir le jour. C’est ce qu’a annoncé le géant français des cosmétiques L’Oréal qui a versé pas moins de 1,2 million de dollars à L’Agence américaine de protection de l’environnement (EPA). En effet, celle-ci travaille en ce moment même au développement sur un système de tests cliniques baptisé ToxCast.À lire aussiDengue : symptômes, traitement, prévention, où en est-on ?Lancé en 2007, celui-ci vise à identifier les composants chimiques d’un produit et leur éventuelle toxicité et comprend aujourd’hui pas moins de 250 tests rapides visant 2.000 substances chimiques avec une toxicité potentielle. “ToxCast est capable d’identifier rapidement des milliers de composants chimiques grâce à des centaines de tests, et fournit des résultats fiables pour plusieurs types de toxicité”, explique dans un communiqué David Dix, l’un des responsables de l’EPA. Or, “en raison des coûts élevés et du temps que prennent les essais sur les animaux, l’éventuelle toxicité de nombreux composants chimiques en circulation n’a pas été évaluée en détails”, ajoute t-il cité par l’AFP. Ainsi, les fonds alloués par L’Oréal permettront d’étudier si ces tests peuvent être utilisés plus largement. Mais outre cette contribution financière, le géant entend bien participer davantage et a d’ores et déjà prévu de fournir des informations sur les produits chimiques utilisés dans ses cosmétiques, élargissant l’éventail des types de composants étudiés par ToxCast et utilisés par l’industrie. L’EPA sera en mesure de comparer les résultats de ToxCast et les données de L’Oréal pour déterminer si la fiabilité et la pertinence (des résultats) sont suffisantes pour publier des estimations (sur l’éventuelle toxicité) des composants chimiques des cosmétiques, précise le communiqué.Actuellement, l’expérimentation animale est soumise à une réglementation très stricte mais des millions d’animaux sont encore utilisés dans la recherche. De nombreux chercheurs affirment ainsi que les traitements de maladies telles que le diabète et la polio ont été possibles grâce aux tests sur les animaux, actuellement utilisés dans la recherche sur les hépatites, le sida et les cellules souches. Pourtant, il existe aujourd’hui plusieurs alternatives plus rapides, plus précises et moins onéreuses que certains rechignent cependant à utiliser. Le 13 mars 2012 à 16:22 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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