Harrison wins 100m hurdles at US Trials

first_imgSACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Olympic 100-metres hurdles gold medallist didn’t race. The bronze medallist couldn’t make the team.Still, they’re thinking a red, white and blue sweep in the event at the London world championships. Just shows the depth of the hurdles.World-record holder Kendra Harrison used a strong start to win her first U.S. outdoor track and field championship yesterday. Nia Ali, the silver medalist at the Rio de Janeiro Games, was second and Christina Manning took third. Because Harrison already had a wild-card berth into worlds in August, 2008 Olympic gold medalist Dawn Harper-Nelson also made the hurdles squad courtesy of her fourth-place finish.”Everyone in this event is really strong,” said Harrison, who finished in 12.60 seconds to beat Ali by a 0.08 margin. “These girls are going to represent and get that sweep like last year (at the Olympics).”In Rio, the 1-2-3 hurdles finish was led by Brianna Rollins, who received a one-year suspension in April for repeated failures to disclose her whereabouts to anti-doping officials. Rollins’ suspension is retroactive to September 27, 2016, the date of her last missed whereabouts report. Also missing from the world team will be Kristi Castlin, the bronze medallist in Rio who wound up sixth in the final.”To make this (hurdles) team, you have to work for it and earn it,” said Harper-Nelson, who drew a three-month suspension that began in December for a positive test. She told anti-doping officials it was caused by blood pressure medication. “That just shows you how strong our team is.”Harrison went all out despite already having a safety net to worlds thanks to her Diamond League title. She needed the work after breaking her left hand while warming up for a hurdles race this spring.”To come from breaking a hand to winning, it means everything,” Harrison said. “My confidence is where it needs to be.”Pole vaulter Sam Kendricks became a member of the six-metre club (19 feet, 8 1/4 inches) in his win. He even waited through a roughly 20-minute delay while officials filled the water pit for the steeplechase.”Every great jumper in history had at least one six-metre jump under their belt,” said Kendricks, an army reservist. “I wanted to be part of the club, the very prestigious club.”NO DOUBLE DESIRELaShawn Merritt and Allyson Felix both ran the 200m yesterday simply to stay race sharp, with no plans to double in London. They each have automatic entries into worlds in the 400m.Justin Gatlin won’t double, either. The winner of the 100m the night before, Gatlin didn’t take the starting line for the 200m. He’s been dealing with nagging quad/groin injuries.last_img read more

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JCA CEO ‘understands’ Tallawahs move

first_imgJamaica Cricket Association (JCA) CEO Courtney Francis said while they are disappointed that the Jamaica Tallawahs are playing most of their home matches in the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) in Florida, he understands the reasons behind the move. There has been a huge outcry from cricket fans across the country following the decision by the Tallawahs’ management to play three of their five home games in Florida. However, Francis said he was made aware of this move some time ago and, while he is not in support of the decision, he acknowledged that it was made in the best interest of the team. “I am disappointed, but I am not angry or anything because I was made aware of this from long ago,” said Francis. “I am disappointed to know that they chose to go and play in Florida, but it understand that it is a business and they chose to do it and the licence that they purchased do not have any restrictions or else they would not have been able to do it (play home games overseas),” he said. EXCELLENT SABINA RECORD “All of us as Jamaicans would love to see the Tallawahs playing at Sabina Park because the win record at Sabina Park is excellent compared to anywhere else in the region,” Francis said. The administrator added that the JCA has no affiliation with the Tallawahs and, therefore, they are not a part of the any negotiations which involves the franchise. “I don’t not know what kind of financial support the other governments give to other franchises, but as it relates to the Jamaica Tallawahs, as far as we are aware, JCA is not a part of the Tallawahs,” he said. Meanwhile, Jeff Miller, CEO of the Tallawahs, while speaking to general financial impracticality and reasons behind the move, has publicly stated that they are the only competing team in the CPL, which does not received any financial support from Government. It reportedly cost the Tallawahs management – Worldwide Sports Management (WSM) – in excess of $9 million to play two games at Sabina Park this season. Meanwhile, WSM also has a deal in place with the Central Broward Regional Park, which hosted the Tallawahs home games in Florida, for exclusive rights for staging international cricket at the facility. robert.bailey@gleanerjm.comlast_img read more

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‘Call me the WORST One!’ – Man United boss has given himself a new nickname

first_img Mourinho celebrates Manchester United’s win at Northampton 1 Jose Mourinho has referred to himself as the ‘Worst One’ rather than the ‘Special One’ after footballing ‘Einsteins’ continued to criticise his faltering Manchester United side.When asked if Saturday evening’s opponents Leicester City could replicate their title-winning performances of last season, Mourinho made light of the situation and referred back to his own title defence as Chelsea boss in 2006.“Not many teams during the Premier League history they could do that,” Mourinho said. “One of the teams was, of course, Man United, another one was some team managed (by) the worst manager in the history of football, but it’s really difficult.”The tongue-in-cheek comment came after United’s midweek EFL Cup victory over Northampton Town, where they ended a run of three straight losses.Mourinho and his players have faced intense scrutiny from the media, who he labelled as ‘Einsteins’.The 53-year-old admitted he wanted to protect his players, but jokingly acknowledged that the “Einsteins” needed to live.“I should protect them, I would love to protect them, and from you I can’t. It is something that is completely out of my control,” he added.“I think it’s a feeling of frustration, but with me it’s fine and with the Einsteins it’s fine.“The Einsteins need money to live. They can’t coach, they can’t sit on the bench, they can’t win matches.”last_img read more

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Santa Clarita Calendar

first_imgSpecial Olympics offers athletic training and competition for athletes with learning disabilities throughout the day at various locations in Santa Clarita. New athletes or volunteer coaches can call (661) 253-2121. SUNDAY Reptile Club will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Placerita Canyon Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Call (661) 259-7721. Santa Clarita Runners Club will meet for marathon training, 6:30 a.m. in the parking lot at Granary Square, 25930 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 294-0821 or visit www.scrunners.org. Bingo will be played, 10:30 a.m. at Mint Canyon Moose Lodge, 18000 W. Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-7222. Saugus train station will be open, 1-4 p.m. at Heritage Junction in William S. Hart Park, 24151 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Call (661) 254-1275. Karaoke night, 7:30 p.m. at VFW Post 6110, 16555 Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-9989. MONDAY Open House, 6-8 p.m. at Temple Beth Ami, 23023 Hilse Lane, Newhall. Call (661) 255-6410. Special Olympics offers golf lessons to athletes with learning disabilities, evenings at Vista Valencia Golf Course, 24700 W. Trevino Drive, Valencia. New athletes or volunteer coaches can call (661) 253-2121. TUESDAY Business Mixer, 7-9 a.m. at Wild Thyme Cafe, 25910 The Old Road, Stevenson Ranch. Call Lois Lopez at (661) 242-7835. Santa Clarita Republican Women will meet, 10 a.m. at Republican Headquarters, 24267 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Call (661) 259-3422. Business workshop titled “Access to Capital,” 3-5 p.m. at the SCV Chamber of Commerce, 28460 Avenue Stanford, Suite 100, Valencia. Cost: $20. Call (661) 294-9375. Business workshop titled “How to Start and Manage a Business,” 5-8 p.m. at the SCV Chamber of Commerce, 28460 Avenue Stanford, Suite 100, Valencia. Cost: $30. Call (661) 294-9375. Nonaerobic workout in a heated pool for joint and muscle conditioning, 10:30 a.m. at the Santa Clarita Valley Family YMCA, 26147 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 253-3593. Santa Clarita Runners Club will work out, 6:15 p.m. at the College of the Canyons track, 26455 N. Rockwell Road, Valencia. Call (661) 294-0821 or visit www.scrunners.org. Sierra Hillbillies Square Dance Club will offer a beginners class, 7-9 p.m. at Mitchell Community School, 16821 Goodvale Road, Canyon Country. Call Cathy at (661) 257-4801 or Tammy at (661) 297-4463. Karaoke night, 7:30 p.m. at VFW Post 6110, 16555 Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-9989. Barbershop Harmony Singers will rehearse, 7:30-9:30 p.m. in the multipurpose room at Valley Oaks Village Apartments, 24700 Valley St., Newhall. Call (661) 259-6109 for security-door information. WEDNESDAY Business After Hours Mixer, 5:30 p.m. at Mission Valley Bank, 25060 W. Avenue Stanford, Valencia. Cost: $10 for members and $25 for nonmembers. Bring a non-perishable food item for local food pantries. Canyon Country Advisory Committee will meet, 7-9 p.m. in the Banquet Room at the Santa Clarita Activities Center, 20880 Centre Point Parkway, Santa Clarita. Call Al Ferdman at (661) 713-9344. Santa Clarita Sunrise Rotary Club will meet, 7:10 a.m. at IHOP, 24737 W. Pico Canyon Road, Stevenson Ranch. Call (661) 250-1023. Santa Clarita Valley Rotary Club will meet, 12:10 p.m. at Marie Callender’s, 27630 The Old Road, Valencia. Call (661) 259-7701. Santa Clarita Valley-Newhall Optimist Clubwill meet, 7 p.m. at La Rumba, 27600 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 252-7313. Valencia Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. Call Kim Dickens at (661) 259-8567 or visit www.valenciatoastmasters.org for location. Karaoke night, 7:30 p.m. at VFW Post 6110, 16555 Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-9989. Special Olympics offers athletic training and competition for athletes with learning disabilities during the evenings at various locations in Santa Clarita. New athletes or volunteer coaches can call (661) 253-2121. Santa Clarita Noon Kiwanis Club will meet, noon-1:30 p.m. at El Torito, 27510 The Old Road, Valencia. Call Janie Choate at (661) 296-8260. Youth Chess Club will meet, 5:30-8 p.m. at 25864-G Tournament Road, Valencia. Call Jay Stallings at (661) 288-1705. Evening Kiwanis Club will meet, 6:15 p.m. at Mulligan’s, 25848 Tournament Road, Valencia. Call Amy Spencer at (661) 255-6714. Santa Clarita Runners Club will meet for tempo runs, 6:15 p.m. Call (661) 294-0821 or visit www.scrunners.org for location. THURSDAY Tyke Hike for toddlers expecting a new brother or sister, 3:30-5 p.m. in the Greeley Room at Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, 23845 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 253-8051. Business workshop titled “Employment Law,” 5-8 p.m. at the SCV Chamber of Commerce, 28460 Avenue Stanford, Suite 100, Valencia. Cost: $30. Call (661) 294-9375. Santa Clarita Corvette Club will meet to socialize, 6:30 p.m. at Route 66 Classic Grill, 18730 Soledad Canyon Road, Canyon Country. Call (661) 298-1494. Free Travel Show will explore Alaska, 7-9 p.m. at the Hyatt Valencia, 24500 Town Center Drive, Valencia. Call AAA at (661) 288-5532. Nonaerobic workout in a heated pool for joint and muscle conditioning, 10:30 a.m. at the Santa Clarita Valley Family YMCA, 26147 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 253-3593. Karaoke night, 7:30 p.m. at VFW Post 6110, 16555 Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-9989. To submit an event for the Daily News calendar, contact Sharon Cotal two weeks prior to the event at (661) 257-5256, fax her at (661) 257-5262, e-mail her at sharon.cotal@dailynews.com or write to her at 24800 Avenue Rockefeller, Valencia, CA 91355.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! FRIDAY Karaoke night, 6:30-9:30 at Vincenzo’s, 24504 1/2 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 259-6733. SATURDAY Free Landscape Education class, 9 a.m.-noon at Castaic Lake Water Agency, located above Central Park at 27234 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call Karen Denkinger at (661) 513-1230. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe Christmas Truce of 1914 proved that peace is possibleItalian Catholic Federation will meet for dinner and scializing, 6:30 p.m. at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, 23233 W. Lyons Ave., Newhall. Dinner: $5. Call Lorraine at (661) 284-1923. Santa Clarita Runners Club will meet for a morning run, 7 o’clock in the parking lot at Starbucks, 26415 Bouquet Canyon Road, Valencia. Call (661) 294-0821 or visit www.scrunners.org. Free wellness workshop will present research about stubborn weight, fatigue and hormone imbalance, 10-11:30 a.m. at the office of Dr. Larry Cart, 24868 Apple St., Suite 101, Newhall. Call (661) 284-6233. Saugus train station will be open, 1-4 p.m. at Heritage Junction in William S. Hart Park, 24151 Newhall Ave. Call (661) 254-1275. Karaoke night, 8 o’clock at VFW Post 6885, 16208 Sierra Highway, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-6885. last_img read more

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Wins, losses and tattoos – the highs and lows of Marcelo Bielsa at Leeds so far

first_img 4 goalless Leeds boss Marcelo Bielsa Strugglers Wigan hold Blackburn to goalless draw in Championship Hull defender MacDonald given all-clear after battle with bowel cancer Leeds lose at Fulham, West Brom held, Charlton’s winless run continues Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ GREAT NEWS 4 Leeds boss Marcelo Bielsa has been embroiled in ‘spy gate’ Marcelo Bielsa: His Leeds highsBeating Stoke and Derby in opening Championship gamesFollowing the rapturous nature of his arrival at Elland Road, Bielsa got his Leeds tenure off to the perfect start.Comprehensive back-to-back wins against Stoke and Derby got the Argentine up and running in style. The fact he was also spotted checking out the side’s U23 team also delighted supporters.Championship Manager of the Month for AugustLeeds went unbeaten during the first month of the season, beating Stoke, Derby, Rotherham and Norwich and drawing with Swansea and Middlesbrough. Marcelo Bielsa’s Leeds are currently top of the Championship Suffering league defeats to Hull and Nottingham Forest and being dumped out of the FA Cup by QPR would certainly have been difficult to swallow for Bielsa.Having to reveal his blue bucket is actually just a blue bucketThe curious case of Bielsa and his blue bucket that has amused the Leeds faithful but left everyone else slightly confused.When asked about his unusual choice of touchline seat, the 63-year-old said: “You want me to tell you more than what it is? It’s just a bucket. I have nothing to add. It’s a comfortable bucket.” stalemate That fine run of form saw Bielsa awarded the Manager of the Month award after his first few weeks in charge. One supporter even felt compelled to get an image of the boss tattooed onto his arm.Consecutive 3-2 wins over Aston Villa and Blackburn around ChristmasThe hectic festive schedule will test any side’s hopes of promotion but Leeds stood up to the task around Christmas.After seeing off Bolton, Bielsa’s men then secured dramatic 3-2 wins over both Aston Villa and Blackburn in the space of just four days. Bielsa’s three Leeds lowsSpy gate scandalBizarre, hilarious, cheating or entertainment? The spy gate scandal that preceded Leeds’ win over Derby will go down as one of this season’s biggest stories.The EFL have been forced to launch a formal investigation after Bielsa admitted to instructing a member of his staff to snoop on a Derby training session. He then used a press conference to explain the lengths he goes to in order to get the lowdown on opponents.Losing three in a row to Hull, Nottingham Forest and QPRIt appeared that Leeds’ wins over Villa and Blackburn took their toll on the side as they then went on a three-game losing streak. Cardiff and Preston play out stalemate in Championship early kick-off Bannan penalty helps Sheffield Wednesday strengthen grip on play-off place 4 ROUND-UP Leeds boss Marcelo Bielsa on his blue bucket 4 REPLY The unorthodox Argentine’s snap press conference today had Leeds fans worried he could leave in the aftermath of ‘spy gate’.But those fears were allied with Bielsa simply wanting two media sit downs this week following a busy week at the club.Amid the ongoing stories coming from west Yorkshire, talkSPORT has had a look back at Bielsa’s brilliant six-month Leeds tenure to date. Leeds knew full well appointing Marcelo Bielsa as their boss was always going to bring a host of headlines.A man known as ‘El Loco’, who decided to sign Mauricio Pochettino after watching him sleep, joined the Elland Road giants in June and has transformed them into Championship title favourites as they strive to reclaim their Premier League status. Latest Championship News EFL result last_img read more

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League Cup draw: Celtic to face Motherwell, Ayr away day for Aberdeen

first_imgThe draw has been made for the last 16 stage of the Betfred Cup, and will bring with it some potentially thrilling clashes.The matches will take place on Tuesday 9 and Wednesday 10 of August.Rangers topped group F with four wins from four matches and will turn their attentions to Peterhead in a repeat of last year’s challenge cup final in the next stage.The four European representatives will all make their bow in the second stage of the competition. Brendan Rodgers’ Celtic draw Motherwell, while Hibernian will face Queen of the South. Seeded Hearts have an away tie against St Johnstone, and Aberdeen follow suit, with an away fixture against Ayr United.Dundee United, who saw off Championship counterparts Dunfermline with a 2-0 home win, will square up against Partick Thistle in the next round.Results of the draw in full below.last_img read more

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Gregor Townsend to replace Vern Cotter as Scotland coach in 2017

first_imgGregor Townsend will replace Vern Cotter as head coach of Scotland’s national rugby team next summer.The Glasgow Warriors coach, who led his team to the PRO12 title in 2015, will take charge at Murrayfied when Cotter’s contract comes to an end in June 2017.The former Scotland international has long been linked with the job, signing a new deal at Scotstoun back in April to take him through to the summer of 2017. His role with the national team runs until 2020.Cotter will remain in charge for the 2017 Six Nations campaign, which starts on February 4 with a home match against Ireland. “The focus has been to respect tradition but also perform in the present, be adaptive and innovative. I have been really pleased with the progress that has been made in all areas.“The players, and my management group, have enjoyed working hard to give the fans and Scottish Rugby results and performances to be proud of.“I intend to remain focused on the upcoming Autumn Internationals and remaining Scotland matches in 2017.” Townsend said: “I am incredibly proud to take on the Scotland head coach role at the end of the season. It is a real honour to be given the responsibility of coaching the national team and I look forward to working with such an impressive group of players.“I’d like to thank Scottish Rugby for this opportunity and also the supporters, players and staff at Glasgow Warriors for their support over the past four years. “My focus is firmly on the season ahead with Glasgow and I will be doing all I can to help the club continue to progress this year.”Outgoing boss Cotter added: “Since taking up this role I believe we have moved forward as a group by working to execute the simple things well. Developing skillsets and mindsets has been important to help perform on the international stage.last_img read more

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Instagram adds the ability to hide offensive & inappropriate comments

first_img Posted on 13th September 2016Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share The internet is a beautiful beast that has brought about connectivity, information and far too much to list in a single post. But for all the good it’s done, it has also spawned anonymous commenting, an opportunity that many times can cultivate inappropriate commentary, abuse and negativity. Today, Instagram has released a new filter that allows users to hide these messages.According to a new post from Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom, the goal of this new feature is to create a community where “everyone feels safe to be themselves without criticism or harassment.” This will apply to comments (not posts) and won’t apply to actual media uploaded.Other options that users have to curtail this behavior include comment deletion, reporting and the blocking of accounts. To enable this feature, simply head to the gear icon in your profile and click on a new “comments” tool. The filter can then be quickly turned on to block the negativity and vulgarity.For more information, see the official Instagram post.From our sponsors: Instagram adds the ability to hide offensive & inappropriate comments Instagram adds the ability to hide offensive & inappropriate commentsYou are here: HomeDigital MarketingInstagram adds the ability to hide offensive & inappropriate comments Related postsLytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019The California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019last_img read more

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Ammonia—a renewable fuel made from sun, air, and water—could power the globe without carbon

first_imgTransportation Yara is taking a first step toward greening that process with a pilot plant, set to open in 2019, that will sit next to the existing Pilbara factory. Instead of relying on natural gas to make H2, the new add-on will feed power from a 2.5-megawatt solar array into a bank of electrolyzers, which split water into H2 and O2. The facility will still rely on the Haber-Bosch reaction to combine the hydrogen with nitrogen to make ammonia. But the solar-powered hydrogen source cuts total CO2 emissions from the process roughly in half.Other projects are following suit. The state of South Australia announced plans in February to build a AU$180 million ammonia plant, again relying on electrolyzers powered by renewable energy. Slated to open in 2020, the plant would be a regional source of fertilizer and liquid ammonia, which can be burned in a turbine or run through a fuel cell to make electricity. The supply of liquid energy will help stabilize the grid in South Australia, which suffered a debilitating blackout in 2016.Ammonia made this way should attract buyers in places such as the European Union and California, which have created incentives to buy greener fuels. And as the market grows, so will the distribution routes for importing ammonia and the technologies for using it, Harris says. By then, fuel cells like MacFarlane’s could be ready to displace Haber-Bosch itself—and the half-green approach to ammonia production could become fully green.Instead of applying fearsome heat and pressure, reverse fuel cells make ammonia by deftly wrangling ions and electrons. As in a battery being charged, charged ions flow between two electrodes supplied with electricity. The anode, covered with a catalyst, splits water molecules into O2, hydrogen ions, and electrons. The protons flow through an electrolyte and a proton-permeable membrane to the cathode, while the electrons make the journey through a wire. At the cathode, catalysts split N2 molecules and prompt the hydrogen ions and electrons to react with nitrogen and make ammonia.At present, the yields are modest. At room temperature and pressure, the fuel cell reactions generally have efficiencies of between 1% and 15%, and the throughput is a trickle. But MacFarlane has found a way to boost efficiencies by changing the electrolyte. In the water-based electrolyte that many groups use, water molecules sometimes react with electrons at the cathode, stealing electrons that would otherwise go into making ammonia. “We’re constantly fighting having the electrons going into hydrogen,” MacFarlane says. David Harris, CSIRO Energy Australia’s windy coasts offer a bounty of energy, which it might one day export as a carbon-free fuel. Related research review Air separation unitSteam reformation CO2 Industrial ammoniaMost of the world’s ammonia is synthesized using Haber–Bosch, a century-old process that is fast and fairly efficient. But the factories emit vast amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2).Gentler reactionsA reverse fuel cell uses renewable electricity to drive a chemical reaction that makes ammonia. Waterreacts at the anode to make hydrogen ions (H+), which migrate to the cathode where they react withnitrogen (N2) to form ammonia. The reaction is efficient, but slow.To marketAmmonia is more than fertilizer. The gas liquefieseasily under light pressure and chilling, and can betransported to power plants to generate carbon-freeelectricity. It can also be “cracked” into H2, a valuableenergy source for fuel cell vehicles. COAST PROTECTION BOARD, SOUTH AUSTRALIA NH 3 A green way to make ammonia Reverse fuel cells can use renewable power to make ammonia from air and water, a far more environmentally friendly technique than the industrial Haber-Bosch process. Renewable ammonia could serve as fertilizer—ammonia’s traditional role—or as an energy-dense fuel. Solar In Australia’s states, politicians see renewable ammonia as a potential source of local jobs and tax revenues, says Brett Cooper, chairman of Renewable Hydrogen, a renewable fuels consulting firm in Sydney. In Queensland, officials are discussing creating an ammonia export terminal in the port city of Gladstone, already a hub for shipping liquefied natural gas to Asia. In February, the state of South Australia awarded AU$12 million in grants and loans to a renewable ammonia project. And last year, an international consortium announced plans to build a US$10 billion combined wind and solar plant known as the Asian Renewable Energy Hub in Western Australia state. Although most of the project’s 9000 megawatts of electricity would flow through an undersea cable to power millions of homes in Indonesia, some of that power could be used to generate ammonia for long-distance export. “Ammonia is the key enabler for exporting renewables,” says David Harris, research director for low-emissions technologies at Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Energy in Pullenvale. “It’s the bridge to a whole new world.”First, however, the evangelists for renewable ammonia will have to displace one of the modern world’s biggest, dirtiest, and most time-honored industrial processes: something called Haber-Bosch.The ammonia factory, a metallic metropolis of pipes and tanks, sits where the red rocks of Western Australia’s Pilbara Desert meet the ocean. Owned by Yara, the world’s biggest producer of ammonia, and completed in 2006, the plant is still gleaming. It is at the technological vanguard and is one of the largest ammonia plants in the world. Yet at its core are steel reactors that still use a century-old recipe for making ammonia.Until 1909, nitrogen-fixing bacteria made most of the ammonia on the planet. But that year, German scientist Fritz Haber found a reaction that, with the aid of iron catalysts, could split the tough chemical bond that holds together molecules of nitrogen, N2, and combine the atoms with hydrogen to make ammonia. The reaction takes brute force—up to 250 atmospheres of pressure in the tall, narrow steel reactors—a process first industrialized by German chemist Carl Bosch. The process is fairly efficient; about 60% of the energy put into the plant ends up being stored in the ammonia’s bonds. Scaled up to factories the size of Yara’s, the process can produce vast amounts of ammonia. Today, the facility makes and ships 850,000 metric tons of ammonia per year—more than double the weight of the Empire State Building.Most is used as fertilizer. Plants crave nitrogen, used in building proteins and DNA, and ammonia delivers it in a biologically available form. Haber-Bosch reactors can churn out ammonia much faster than natural processes can, and in recent decades the technology has enabled farmers to feed the world’s exploding population. It’s estimated that at least half the nitrogen in the human body today comes from a synthetic ammonia plant.Haber-Bosch led to the Green Revolution, but the process is anything but green. It requires a source of hydrogen gas (H2), which is stripped away from natural gas or coal in a reaction using pressurized, super-heated steam. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is left behind, accounting for about half the emissions from the overall process. The second feedstock, N2, is easily separated from air, which is 78% nitrogen. But generating the pressure needed to meld hydrogen and nitrogen in the reactors consumes more fossil fuels, which means more CO2. The emissions add up: Ammonia production consumes about 2% of the world’s energy and generates 1% of its CO2. NH 3 NH 3 However distant, the prospect of Asia-bound tankers, full of green Australian ammonia, raises the next question. “Once you get ammonia to market, how do you get the energy out of it?” asks Michael Dolan, a chemist at CSIRO Energy in Brisbane.The simplest option, Dolan says, is to use the green ammonia as fertilizer, like today’s ammonia but without the carbon penalty. Beyond that, ammonia could be converted into electricity in a power plant customized to burn ammonia, or in a traditional fuel cell, as the South Australia plant plans to do. But currently, ammonia’s highest value is as a rich source of hydrogen, used to power fuel cell vehicles. Whereas ammonia fertilizer sells for about $750 a ton, hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles can go for more than 10 times that amount.In the United States, fuel cell cars seem all but dead, vanquished by battery-powered vehicles. But Japan is still backing fuel cells heavily. The country has spent more than US$12 billion on hydrogen technology as part of its strategy to reduce fossil fuel imports and meet its commitment to reduce CO2 emissions under the Paris climate accord. Today the country has only about 2500 fuel cell vehicles on the road. But by 2030 Japanese officials expect 800,000. And the nation is eyeing ammonia as a way to fuel them.Converting hydrogen into ammonia only to convert it back again might seem strange. But hydrogen is hard to ship: It has to be liquefied by chilling it to temperatures below −253°C, using up a third of its energy content. Ammonia, by contrast, liquefies at −10°C under a bit of pressure. The energy penalty of converting the hydrogen to ammonia and back is roughly the same as chilling hydrogen, Dolan says—and because far more infrastructure already exists for handling and transporting ammonia, he says, ammonia is the safer bet.That last step—stripping hydrogen off ammonia molecules—is what Dolan and his colleagues are working on. In a cavernous metal warehouse on the CSIRO campus that has long been used to study coal combustion, two of Dolan’s colleagues are assembling a 2-meter-tall reactor that is dwarfed by a nearby coal reactor. When switched on, the reactor will “crack” ammonia into its two constituents: H2, to be gathered up for sale, and N2, to waft back into the air. STEVEN MORTON/FELLOW OF THE ROYAL PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY SYDNEY, BRISBANE, AND MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA—The ancient, arid landscapes of Australia are fertile ground for new growth, says Douglas MacFarlane, a chemist at Monash University in suburban Melbourne: vast forests of windmills and solar panels. More sunlight per square meter strikes the country than just about any other, and powerful winds buffet its south and west coasts. All told, Australia boasts a renewable energy potential of 25,000 gigawatts, one of the highest in the world and about four times the planet’s installed electricity production capacity. Yet with a small population and few ways to store or export the energy, its renewable bounty is largely untapped.That’s where MacFarlane comes in. For the past 4 years, he has been working on a fuel cell that can convert renewable electricity into a carbon-free fuel: ammonia. Fuel cells typically use the energy stored in chemical bonds to make electricity; MacFarlane’s operates in reverse. In his third-floor laboratory, he shows off one of the devices, about the size of a hockey puck and clad in stainless steel. Two plastic tubes on its backside feed it nitrogen gas and water, and a power cord supplies electricity. Through a third tube on its front, it silently exhales gaseous ammonia, all without the heat, pressure, and carbon emissions normally needed to make the chemical. “This is breathing nitrogen in and breathing ammonia out,” MacFarlane says, beaming like a proud father.Companies around the world already produce $60 billion worth of ammonia every year, primarily as fertilizer, and MacFarlane’s gizmo may allow them to make it more efficiently and cleanly. But he has ambitions to do much more than help farmers. By converting renewable electricity into an energy-rich gas that can easily be cooled and squeezed into a liquid fuel, MacFarlane’s fuel cell effectively bottles sunshine and wind, turning them into a commodity that can be shipped anywhere in the world and converted back into electricity or hydrogen gas to power fuel cell vehicles. The gas bubbling out of the fuel cell is colorless, but environmentally, MacFarlane says, ammonia is as green as can be. “Liquid ammonia is liquid energy,” he says. “It’s the sustainable technology we need.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Ammonia—one nitrogen atom bonded to three hydrogen atoms—may not seem like an ideal fuel: The chemical, used in household cleaners, smells foul and is toxic. But its energy density by volume is nearly double that of liquid hydrogen—its primary competitor as a green alternative fuel—and it is easier to ship and distribute. “You can store it, ship it, burn it, and convert it back into hydrogen and nitrogen,” says Tim Hughes, an energy storage researcher with manufacturing giant Siemens in Oxford, U.K. “In many ways, it’s ideal.”Researchers around the globe are chasing the same vision of an “ammonia economy,” and Australia is positioning itself to lead it. “It’s just beginning,” says Alan Finkel, Australia’s chief scientist who is based in Canberra. Federal politicians have yet to offer any major legislation in support of renewable ammonia, Finkel says, perhaps understandable in a country long wedded to exporting coal and natural gas. But last year, the Australian Renewable Energy Agency declared that creating an export economy for renewables is one of its priorities. This year, the agency announced AU$20 million in initial funds to support renewable export technologies, including shipping ammonia. That reactor is basically a larger version of Giddey’s membrane reactor, operating in reverse. Only here, gaseous ammonia is piped into the space between two concentric metal tubes. Heat, pressure, and metal catalysts break apart ammonia molecules and push hydrogen atoms toward the tube’s hollow core, where they combine to make H2 that’s sucked out and stored.Ultimately, Dolan says, the reactor will produce 15 kilograms per day of 99.9999% pure hydrogen, enough to power a few fuel cell cars. Next month, he plans to demonstrate the reactor to automakers, using it to fill tanks in a Toyota Mirai and Hyundai Nexo, two fuel cell cars. He says his team is in late-stage discussions with a company to build a commercial pilot plant around the technology. “This is a very important piece of the jigsaw puzzle,” Cooper says.Beyond 2030, Japan will likely import between $10 billion and $20 billion of hydrogen each year, according to a renewable energy roadmap recently published by Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. Japan, Singapore, and South Korea have all begun discussions with Australian officials about setting up ports for importing renewably produced hydrogen or ammonia. “How it all comes together economically, I don’t know,” Harris says. “But it looks like there’s enough interest to get this industry started.”Cooper knows how he wants it to end. Over coffee on a rainy morning in Sydney, he describes his futuristic vision for renewable ammonia. When he squints, he can see, maybe 30 years down the road, Australia’s coast dotted with supertankers, docked at offshore rigs. But they wouldn’t be filling up with oil. Seafloor powerlines would carry renewable electricity to the rigs from wind and solar farms on shore. On board, one device would use the electricity to desalinate seawater and pass the fresh water to electrolyzers to produce hydrogen. Another device would filter nitrogen from the sky. Reverse fuel cells would knit the two together into ammonia for loading on the tankers—a bounty of energy from the sun, air, and sea.It’s the dream that nuclear fusion never reached, he says: inexhaustible carbon-free power, only this time from ammonia. “It can never run out, and there is no carbon in the system.”center_img OutputEfficiency Beyond fossil fuel–driven nitrogen transformations V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE By Robert F. ServiceJul. 12, 2018 , 2:00 PM Power CrackingN2 OutputEfficiency A component in a reverse fuel cell uses renewable power to knit together water and nitrogen to make ammonia. Ammonia—a renewable fuel made from sun, air, and water—could power the globe without carbon AirHigh temperature and pressureLow temperature and pressureN2H2H2CO2Natural gas To minimize that competition, he opted for what’s called an ionic liquid electrolyte. That approach allows more N2 and less water to sit near the catalysts on the cathode, boosting the ammonia production. As a result, the efficiency of the fuel cell skyrocketed from below 15% to 60%, he and his colleagues reported last year in Energy & Environmental Science. The result has since improved to 70%, MacFarlane says—but with a tradeoff. The ionic liquid in his fuel cell is goopy, 10 times more viscous than water. Protons have to slog their way to the cathode, slowing the rate of ammonia production. “That hurts us,” MacFarlane says.To speed things up, MacFarlane and his colleagues are toying with their ionic liquids. In a study published in April in ACS Energy Letters, they report devising one rich in fluorine, which helps protons pass more easily and speeds ammonia production by a factor of 10. But the production rate still needs to rise by orders of magnitude before his cells can meet targets, set for the field by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), that would begin to challenge Haber-Bosch.Next to Monash University, Sarb Giddey and his colleagues at the Clayton offices of CSIRO Energy are making ammonia with their “membrane reactor.” It relies on high temperatures and modest pressures—far less than those in a Haber-Bosch reactor—that, compared to MacFarlane’s cell, boost throughput while sacrificing efficiency. The reactor designs call for a pair of concentric long metallic tubes, heated to 450°C. Into the narrow gap between the tubes flows H2, which could be made by a solar- or wind-powered electrolyzer. Catalysts lining the gap split the H2 molecules into individual hydrogen atoms, which modest pressures then force through the atomic lattice of the inner tube wall to its hollow core, where piped-in N2 molecules await. A catalytically active metal such as palladium lines the inner surface, splitting the N2 and coaxing the hydrogen and nitrogen to combine into ammonia—much faster than in MacFarlane’s cell. So far only a small fraction of the input H2 reacts in any given pass—another knock to the reactor’s efficiency.Other approaches are in the works. At the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, researchers led by Ryan O’Hayre are developing button-size reverse fuel cells. Made from ceramics to withstand high operating temperatures, the cell can synthesize ammonia at record rates—about 500 times faster than MacFarlane’s fuel cell. Like Giddey’s membrane reactors, the ceramic fuel cells sacrifice some efficiency for output. Even so, O’Hayre says, they still need to improve production rates by another factor of 70 to meet the DOE targets. “We have a lot of ideas,” O’Hayre says.Whether any of those approaches will wind up being both efficient and fast is still unknown. “The community is still trying to figure out what direction to go,” says Lauren Greenlee, a chemical engineer at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Grigorii Soloveichik, a manager in Washington, D.C., for the DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy program on making renewable fuels, agrees. “To make [green] ammonia is not hard,” he says. “Making it economically on a large scale is hard.” CO2 CO2 FertilizerAmmonia power plantFuel cell vehicleAmmonia made near farms Wind It looks like there’s enough interest to get this industry started.last_img read more

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Manchester City star Bernardo Silva accused of racism after offensive tweets to teammate resurface

first_imgImage Courtesy: Getty/TwitterAdvertisementBernardo Silva, the Manchester City midfielder, has just became a controversy icon, as an ‘allegedly racist’ tweet has surfaced which targets his club teammate Benjamin Mendy, and the English football scene is fuming.Image Courtesy: Getty/TwitterSilva recently posted on Twitter a childhood photo of the Citizen left back, comparing him with the mascot of ‘Conguitos’- a Spanish chocolate brand, along with the caption “Guess who?”Although the French international has showed no signs of offense, and replying with “1-0 for you will see” and emoticons, the larger portion of social media believes there is a hidden racist abuse implied, even if Silva did it unintentionally.The Portuguese attacking midfielder was prompt to delete the tweet, but it has resurfaced via @JacobSteinberg, a Football reporter for The Guardian. Check it out below-Understand that the Football Association are looking into this tweet allegedly posted by Manchester City’s Bernardo Silva earlier today. Tweet was later deleted #mcfc pic.twitter.com/xxVfMaU6Xw— Jacob Steinberg (@JacobSteinberg) September 22, 2019The Football Association is currently scrutinizing the 25 year old’s post, who has faced huge slack from the fans around the globe, and tweeted a reply: “Can’t even joke with a friend these days… You guys…”If the FA doesn’t intend Silva’s tweet to be taken as a ‘joke’, the Portuguese international may face a ban extending up to six games.Last Saturday, Silva secured a hat trick as Pep’s side went on a humiliation spree against Wolves at the Etihad Stadium, netting in a total of 8 goals with a clean sheet.Advertisementlast_img read more

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